THE DEATH OF CARTHAGE: Second Edition (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Trafford Publishing, Sep 24, 2012 - Fiction - 336 pages
5 Reviews
The Death of Carthage tells the story of the Second and third Punic wars that took place between ancient Rome and Carthage in three parts. The first book, Carthage Must Be Destroyed, covering the second Punic war, is told in the first person by Lucius Tullius Varro, a young Roman of equestrian status who is recruited into the Roman cavalry at the beginning of the war in 218 BC. Lucius serves in Spain under the Consul Publius Cornelius Scipio and his brother, the Proconsul Cneius Cornelius Scipio.
Captivus, the second book, is narrated by Lucius's first cousin Enneus, who is recruited to the Roman cavalry under Gaius Flaminius and taken prisoner by Hannibal's general Maharbal after the disastrous Roman defeat at Lake Trasimene in 217 BC. Enneus is transported to Greece and sold as a slave, where he is put to work as a shepherd on a large estate and establishes his life there.
The third and final book, The Death of Carthage, is narrated by Enneus's son, Ectorius. As a rare bilingual, Ectorius becomes a translator and serves in the Roman army during the war and witnesses the total destruction of Carthage in the year 146 BC.
This historical saga, full of minute details on day-to-day life in ancient times, depicts two great civilizations on the cusp of influencing the world for centuries to come.
  

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Review: The Death of Carthage

User Review  - Linda Riebel - Goodreads

Writing a historical novel is a triple challenge. The author must tell an engaging story with memorable characters and include all the other elements of good fiction. In addition, he or she has ... Read full review

Review: The Death of Carthage

User Review  - Dw - Goodreads

This is book is not like the tales of Mccullough or Scarrow. It is of a different time and style then either of those. It is told first person from four perspectives and as such it takes some time to ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1
1
Chapter 2
15
Chapter 3
20
Chapter 4
32
Chapter 5
40
Chapter 6
44
Chapter 7
51
Chapter 8
59
Chapter 7
157
Chapter 8
161
Chapter 9
165
Chapter 10
170
Chapter 11
176
Chapter 12
181
Chapter 13
186
Chapter 1
193

Chapter 9
68
Chapter 10
72
Chapter 11
76
Chapter 12
78
Chapter 13
86
Chapter 14
92
Chapter 15
99
Chapter 16
107
Chapter 17
113
Chapter 1
129
Chapter 2
134
Chapter 3
139
Chapter 4
144
Chapter 5
147
Chapter 6
154
Chapter 2
198
Chapter 3
209
Chapter 4
221
Chapter 5
230
Chapter 6
247
Chapter 7
257
Chapter 8
265
Chapter 9
271
Chapter 10
276
The Last Carthaginian
293
Footnotes from Carthage Must be destroyed
299
Footnotes to The Death of Carthage
301
Bibliography
303
Glossary for The Death of Carthage
305
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

The Death of Carthage tells the story of the Second and third Punic wars that took place between ancient Rome and Carthage in three parts. The first book, Carthage Must Be Destroyed, covering the second Punic war, is told in the first person by Lucius Tullius Varro, a young Roman of equestrian status who is recruited into the Roman cavalry at the beginning of the war in 218 BC. Lucius serves in Spain under the Consul Publius Cornelius Scipio and his brother, the Proconsul Cneius Cornelius Scipio. Captivus, the second book, is narrated by Lucius?s first cousin Enneus, who is recruited to the Roman cavalry under Gaius Flaminius and taken prisoner by Hannibal?s general Maharbal after the disastrous Roman defeat at Lake Trasimene in 217 BC. Enneus is transported to Greece and sold as a slave, where he is put to work as a shepherd on a large estate and establishes his life there. The third and final book, The Death of Carthage, is narrated by Enneus?s son, Ectorius. As a rare bilingual, Ectorius becomes a translator and serves in the Roman army during the war and witnesses the total destruction of Carthage in the year 146 BC. This historical saga, full of minute details on day-to-day life in ancient times, depicts two great civilizations on the cusp of influencing the world for centuries to come.

Bibliographic information