Peace by Peaceful Means: Peace and Conflict, Development and Civilization

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SAGE, Apr 28, 1996 - Political Science - 280 pages
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Johan Galtung, one of the founders of modern peace studies, provides a wide-ranging panorama of the ideas, theories and assumptions on which the study of peace is based.

The book is organized in four parts, each examining the one of the four major theoretical approaches to peace. The first part covers peace theory, exploring the epistemological assumptions of peace. In Part Two conflict theory is examined with an exploration of nonviolent and creative handling of conflict. Developmental theory is discussed in Part Three, exploring structural violence, particularly in the economic field, together with a consideration of the ways of overcoming that violence. The fourth part is devoted to civilization theory. This involves an

  

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Contents

Visions of Peace for the 21st Century
1
Peace Theory
9
Some Basic Paradigms
24
Man Peace Violence?
40
Dictatorship Peace War?
49
Dissociative Associative Confederal
60
II Conflict Theory
70
Conflict LifeCycles
81
Six Economic Schools
139
The Externalities
154
Ten Theses on Eclectic Development Theory
177
an Approach Across Spaces
185
Civilization Theory
196
an Impressionistic Presentation
211
Peace War Conflict Development
223
Specifications Hitlerism Stalinism Reaganism
241

Conflict Transformations
89
Conflict Interventions
103
Nonviolent Conflict Transformation
114
Development Theory
126
Are There Therapies for Pathological Cosmologies?
253
Peace and Conflict Development and Civilization
265
Index
275
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About the author (1996)

Johan Galtung, dr hc mult, is Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Haiwaii, the University of Witten/Herdecke, the European Peace University and the University of Troms[o with a line through it]o. One of the founders of peace research, he established the International Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO) in 1959 and the Journal of Peace Research in 1964. He has published over 50 books, including, Essays in Peace Research, Theories and Methods of Social Science Research, Human Rights in Another Key (1994) and Choose Peace (1995).

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