Storing Carbon in Agricultural Soils

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Norman J. Rosenberg, Roberto C. Izaurralde
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 31, 2001 - Nature - 117 pages
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Soil carbon sequestration can play a strategic role in controlling the increase of CO2 in the atmosphere and thereby help mitigate climatic change. There are scientific opportunities to increase the capacity of soils to store carbon and remove it from circulation for longer periods of time. The vast areas of degraded and desertified lands throughout the world offer great potential for the sequestration of very large quantities of carbon. If credits are to be bought and sold for carbon storage, quick and inexpensive instruments and methods will be needed to monitor and verify that carbon is actually being added and maintained in soils. Large-scale soil carbon sequestration projects pose economic and social problems that need to be explored.
This book focuses on scientific and implementation issues that need to be addressed in order to advance the discipline of carbon sequestration from theory to reality. The main issues discussed in the book are broad and cover aspects of basic science, monitoring, and implementation. The opportunity to restore productivity of degraded lands through carbon sequestration is examined in detail.
This book will be of special interest to professionals in agronomy, soil science, and climatology.
  

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Contents

SCIENCE NEEDS AND NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR INCREASING SOIL CARBON SEQUESTRATION
11
POTENTIAL OF DESERTIFICATION CONTROL TO SEQUESTER CARBON AND MITIGATE THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT
35
MONITORING AND VERIFYING CHANGES OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL
73
POLICY AND ECONOMICS
101
Copyright

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Page 2 - Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Rio De Janeiro in 1992 (United Nations, 1992). The convention aims at the ‘stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system'. In December
Page 5 - The workshop was attended by nearly 100 Canadian and US scientists, practitioners and policy-makers representing agricultural commodity groups and industries, Congress, government agencies, national laboratories, universities and the World Bank. Support for the workshop was provided by the Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Agriculture, the Department of Energy, the Monsanto Company and NASA.
Page 1 - has increased by -¿32%, from about 280 ppmv (parts per million by volume) at the beginning of the industrial revolution (ca. 1850) to about 370 ppmv today, There is a strong consensus among atmospheric scientists that continued increase in the concentration of atmospheric CO 2 and other greenhouse gases such as methane
Page 5 - sequestration programs worldwide? A workshop to explore these questions was organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology and was held in December of 1998 in St.
Page 1 - 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) will enhance the earth's natural greenhouse effect and lead to global warming (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC, 1996), Some scientists argue from the fact that 1997 was the warmest and 1998 the second warmest years on record that the global climate change ‘footprint
Page 6 - sequestration on these lands is probably even greater than on currently farmed lands. Improvements in rangeland management, dryland farming and irrigation can add C to soils in these regions and provide the impetus for changes in land management practices that will begin the essential process of stabilizing
Page 5 - Can methods be developed to increase still further the quantities of C that accumulate in soils and, perhaps more importantly, the length of time during which the C resides in soils? (2) Can opportunities for soil C sequestration be extended beyond the currently farmed lands to the vast areas of degraded and desertified lands worldwide? (3) Can we develop

About the author (2001)

The author is Regent's Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Meteorology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Laboratory Fellow Emeritus at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland-College Park.