A SCHOOL DICTIONARY OF GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1851
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 61 - XVIII XVII XVI XV XIV XIII XII XI X IX VIII VII VI v IV III p cT W S.
Page 40 - The next and most common form is that which has the two-faced head of Janus on one side, and the prow of a ship on the other (whence the expression used by Roman boys in tossing up, Capita...
Page 378 - Findlay's Classical Atlas, To illustrate Ancient Geography ; comprised in 25 Maps, showing the various Divisions of the World as known to the Ancients. With an Index of the Ancient and Modern Names.
Page 18 - They would destroy no city of the Amphictyons, nor cut off their streams in war or peace ; and if any should do so, they would march against him and destroy his cities ; and should any pillage the property of the god, or be privy to or plan any thing against what was in his temple at Delphi, they would take vengeance on him with hand and foot, and voice, and all their might.
Page 134 - the remains of a worship which preceded the rise of the Hellenic mythology and its attendant rites, grounded on a view of nature, less fanciful, more earnest, and better fitted to awaken both philosophical thought and religious feeling.
Page 110 - Persia, stamped on one side with the figure of an archer crowned and kneeling upon one knee, and on the other with a sort of quadrata incusa or deep cleft.
Page 304 - SUOVETAURI'LIA. [SACRIFICIUM, p. 277; LUSTRATIO, p. 206; and wood-cut on p. 296.] SU'PPARUM. [NAVis, p. 224.] SUPPER. [COENA; DEIPNON.] SUPPUCA'TIO, a solemn thanksgiving or supplication to the gods, decreed by the senate, when all the temples were opened, and the statues of the gods frequently placed in public upon couches (pulvinaria), to which the people offered up their thanksgivings and prayers.
Page 304 - Sycophantes in the time of Aristophanes and Demosthenes designated a person of a peculiar class, not capable of being described by any single word in our language, but well understood and appreciated by an Athenian. He had not much in common with our sycophant, but was a happy compound of the common barretor, informer, pettifogger, busybody, rogue, liar, and slanderer.
Page 348 - vallus,' ' a stake ; ' and properly means the palisade which ran along the outer edge of the ' agger,' or ' mound ; ' but it frequently includes the ' agger

Bibliographic information