Penal Laws and Test Act: Questions Touching Their Repeal Propounded in 1687-8 by James II., to the Deputy Lieutenants and Magistrates of the Counties of Cumberland, Westmorland, Durham [etc.] ... from the Original Returns in the Bodleian Library (Google eBook)

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Sir George Floyd Duckett
T. Wilson, 1882 - Criminal law - 492 pages
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Page 201 - God, Prince of Orange, etc., of the Reasons inducing him to appear in Arms in the Kingdom of ENGLAND, for preserving of the Protestant Religion, and for Restoring of the Laws and Liberties of England, Scotland, and Ireland I.
Page 392 - ... fit to call a Parliament, whether he will be for taking off the penal laws and the tests. 2. Whether he will assist and contribute to the election of such members as shall be for taking off the penal laws and tests. 3. Whether he will support the king's declaration for liberty of conscience by living friendly with those of all persuasions, as subjects of the same prince and good Christians ought to do.
Page 57 - Lieutenancy, either jointly or separately, as he shall think best, and ask them, one by one, the following Questions : — 1. If in case he shall be chosen Knight of the Shire, or Burgesse of a Towne, when the King shall think fitt to call a parliament, whether he will be for taking of the Penall Lawes and the Tests.
Page 174 - King shall think fitt to call a Parliament, whether he will be for taking off the Penal Laws and the Tests ? 2. Whether he will assist and contribute to the election of such members as shall be for taking off the Penal Laws and Tests ? 3. Whether he will support the King's Declaration for Liberty of Conscience, by living friendly with those of all perswasions, as subjects of the same Prince, and good Christians ought to do?
Page 200 - Parliament when we shall think it convenient for them to meet. In the first place we do declare that we will protect and maintain our archbishops, bishops and clergy, and all other our subjects of the Church of England in the free exercise of their religion as by law established, and in the quiet and full enjoyment of all their possessions, without any molestation or disturbance whatsoever.
Page 24 - Curiosa]. to all the Deputy Lieutenants and Magistrates in their respective Lieutenancies, touching their private sentiments in respect to these Penal Laws and Test Act. This measure of canvassing those, who were likely to be members of any future Parliament he might wish to convoke, the King considered extremely desirable, as bearing a semblance of that constitutional authority, which he had hitherto so thoroughly disregarded, previous to any future elections, when he hoped to carry the repeal of...
Page 392 - ... 1. If in case he shall be chosen knight of the shire, or burgess of a town, when the king shall think fit to call a Parliament, whether he will be for taking off the penal laws and the tests. 2. Whether he will assist and contribute to the election of such members as shall be for taking off the penal laws and tests.
Page 201 - They have also followed the same method in relation to civil affairs, for they have procured orders to examine all Lords Lieutenants, Deputy Lieutenants, Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, and all others that were in any...
Page 66 - If I be chosen a Member of Parliament I conceive myself obliged to give my vote according to the reason of the debate of the House and not otherwise. 2. If I shall concern myself in the election of any to serve as...
Page 22 - Society." still more desirable, but imperative, to retain those wholesome restrictions on the development of a faith, not tolerated by the masses of the people. The obligations of the Test Act, which had been passed in the last reign, (25 Charles II.) are well known. They required every person holding any office, civil or military, not only to take the oath of allegiance and supremacy, but that he should receive the sacrament in the form prescribed by the Church of England, or be incapable of receiving...

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