Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States: Documents, Data, and Analysis (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Zbigniew Brzezinski, Paige Sullivan, Center for Strategic and International Studies (Washington, D.C.)
M.E. Sharpe, 1997 - History - 866 pages
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Assembled here is a documentary portrait of the CIS, drawing on more than 500 official publications and releases and reports from the broadcast and print media. Excep-tionally comprehensive in scope and breadth, Russia and the Commonwealth of lndepen-dent States presents the actual texts of CIS accords and protocols as well as commentary from leading journalists and political actors.

The documents are grouped within 10 chapters. Each chapter is preceded by introductory notes written by the editors, supplying historical background and identification of key issues surrounding the documents presented.

Also included is a collection of maps which provide geographical detail of the CIS, Russia's Ethnic Republics. The Caucasus and Central Asia, Major Muslim Ethnic Groups in Armenia, Iran, and the Islamic Commonwealth States, and the Major Defense Facilities in the CIS Territory.

The volume concludes with five appendixes which provide a chronological listing of key events, CIS development, CIS data, and Country Profiles, in which a political profile, area map, economic and demographic statistics are provided for the 12 member states.

  

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Culled chiefly from the Foreign Broadcast Information Service, the documents and data on the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) collected here illustrate key events in the Soviet Union's breakup ... Read full review

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Contents

Nazarbaev on Eurasian Union CIS Future
351
Lukashenka Criticizes Eurasian Union Plan
352
Meshkov Supports Eurasian Union
353
The Central Asian Union
354
Agreement on Economic Cooperation in the Implementation of Projects of Mutual Interest
355
News Conference
356
Agreements Discussion Outlined
357
Uzbekistan Repudiates Charges of Undermining Russias Interests
358

State Council Views Economic Union
30
Kravchuk Disagrees with One Plus Ten
31
The Treaty on an Economic Community
32
President Gorbachevs Appeal to Ukrainian
37
Yeltsins Reactions to a Union Without Ukraine
38
No Obstacles to Recognition of Ukraine
39
Three Plus Eight From the USSR to the CIS Introductory Notes
41
Ukrainian Foreign Minister Views New Political Concept
42
Ukrainian President Receives US Under Secretary of State
43
Declaration on the New Commonwealth
45
Declaration on Economic Policy
46
The AlmaAta Declaration
47
Gorbachev Resigns as USSR President
48
Anuar Alimzhanov Addresses the Final Session of the Supreme Soviet
50
Stanislav Shushkevich Previews Minsk Summit Meeting
51
Agreement on Council of Heads of State and Heads of Government
52
Commentary Final Attempt at Normal Life
53
Commonwealth of Uncivilized States Observed
54
Former Defense Minister Evgeniy Shaposhnikov Interviewed
55
The Grand Debates Whither Whether and What?
57
Russias Great Power Debate Introductory Notes
59
31 Article Assesses Role of the Commonwealth Peace
64
Yeltsin Defends His Foreign Policy
65
Border Changes Even if Fair Are Not Desirable
66
ShelovKovedyaev Comments on Policy Criticism
67
Andrey Kozyrev Outlines Foreign Policy Priorities
73
Address by Andrey Kozyrev Before the Russian Supreme Soviet
79
Boris Yeltsin Addresses Minsk Summit
80
Andrey Kozyrev on Russias Peacekeeping Role in the CIS
82
Audrey Kozyrev Addresses Russian Ambassadors to CIS States
83
Russias Westernization Stage Is Seen as Over
85
Kozyrev Responds to Reports of Impending Dismissal
86
Daily Names Potential Candidates
87
Yeltsin Accepts Kozyrevs Resignation
88
Ambartsumov on the Need for Change in Foreign Policy
89
Russian Neighbors Urged to Sign Border Treaties
91
Khashulatov on the South Ossetia Conflict
93
Rutskoy Party Leader Slams Foreign Policy
94
Stankevich Calls for More Assertive Diplomacy
95
Ambartsumov Foreign Policy Concept Viewed
97
Russia Is Again Receiving Compatriots From Abroad
99
Rutskoy Article Views Nationalist TrendsSovereignty
100
Ambartsumov on the Shaping of Foreign Policy
104
Academics Present Report on CIS Integration
106
Rutskoy Discusses New Opposition Movement
107
Text of FIS Report Presented by Primakov
108
Primakov Reflects on Intelligence Role
115
United States Trying to Force Russia and Ukraine Apart
117
Korzhakovs Role in Party of War Viewed
118
Press Coverage of CIS Espionage
120
Intelligence Chief Views Changed Priorities
122
Yeltsin Appoints Primakov as New Foreign Minister
124
Bogomolov on Economic Reform Foreign Policy
129
Vladimir Lukin on Relations with the CIS and with the West
135
111 kin on the Dangers of SelfDetermination
141
Importance of Russian Interests in Near Abroad Stressed
143
Chernishev on Caspian Demarcation and the Transcaucasus
150
Russian Minister Previews Summit
154
343 Zyuganovs Report to Third CPRF Congress
156
Vladimir Zhirinovskiy Reviews the Era of Gorbachev and Yeltsin
163
Zhirinovskiy Brands Kozyrev Gaydar Evil Democrats
166
Zyuganov on Religion Russian Idea
167
Zyuganov Argues for Review of the Lefts Tactics
170
Zyuganov Rejects NATO Expansion and Backs USSR Revival
173
Foreign Policy in the NonRussian States Introductory Notes
175
Central Asia
176
41 Nazarbaev Favorably Views Talks with Russia on the Ruble Zone
177
Nazarbaev New Currency Is Not a Break with Russia
178
Nazarbaev on CIS Ties Trade and Disarmament
179
Almaty Views Russian LDP Statement as Provocation
180
Nazarbaev on Baykonur and Military Ties with Russia
181
Nazarbaev Style and Handling of Russian Question Examined
182
Nazarbaev Nobody Knows What Russia Wants
184
RussianKazakh Commission Discusses Baykonur Base
186
Russian Foreign Policy in Caucasus and Central Asia Viewed
188
Kazakh Government Hails Russias CIS Policy
190
Military Questions Need for Own Armed Forces
191
Akaev Reforms Impossible Without RussianCooperation
192
Akaev on Ethnic Issues Relations with Neighbors
193
Russian Troop Commander Due in Bishkek to Sign Agreements
194
Deputy Foreign Minister on Relations with Russia CIS
197
Akaev on the Economy Policies and Integration
198
Bishkek Welcomes Moscow Decision on CIS Relations
201
423 Russian Delegation Head on Islamists
202
Rakhmonov Favors Strengthening Ties with CIS States
206
Rakhmonov on National Issues and Ties with Russia
208
Moscow Prompts Tajikistan to Withdraw from Ruble Zone
209
428 Nations NonCIS Links Said to Be Favored over CIS Links
210
Russians to Help Establish Turkmen Air Force
211
Russia Seen as Guarantor of Its Independence
212
Niyazov Favors Speeding Up Trade Deal with Russia
214
Shikhmuradov Views Niyazov Appeal for Neutrality Status
215
Interview with CIS Leaders
216
Karimov Reports on the Economy and Rejects Dual Citizenship
217
Russian Banknotes Cease to Be Legal Tender
218
Karimov Says Russia Is Losing Uzbekistans Market
220
Karimov Discusses CIS Meeting Tajik
221
446 Steps for Creation of Army Urged
222
TerPetrosyan on Foreign and Domestic Affairs
223
Armenia Thinks Caucasian Home Concept Is Premature
224
Armenian Premier Proposes Collective CIS Currency
225
454 Russias Regional Policy Eyed and Assessed
226
Abulfaz Elchibey Comments on Russias Role in Caucasian War
227
President Aliev on the Present Situation and Joining the CIS
228
Aliev Urges Closer Integration in the CIS
230
Aliev on Ties with Russia and Other Topics
232
460 Shevardnadze to Back Elchibeys Caucasus Idea
234
Shevardnadze Interviewed on Conflict CIS
236
Georgia Balkanization Has Perils for Russia
237
Shevardnadze Discusses the CIS Russia and Other Issues
238
Further on Shevardnadze and the CIS
240
Shevardnadze Comments on the CIS Summit in Moscow
241
The States of the Western Region
242
Shushkevich Addresses Supreme Soviet
245
Lukashenka on the CIS and the Belovezh Forest Agreements
246
473 Snegur Opposes Centralized Structures in the CIS
247
Foreign Ministry Worried About Yeltsin Statement
248
Kravchuk and Moldovas Snegur Hold a News Conference
249
Foreign Minister on Russian Ties and Federation
250
Leaders View CIS Ties and Economic Issues
251
Concern About Arrival of New Recruits in Dniester
252
The Ukrainian Perspective Introductory Notes
253
Kravchuk Comments on Russian Arrogance
255
Kravchuk Comments on Relations Within CIS
257
Background to Conflict over Crimea Viewed
260
Supreme Soviet Statement on Crimea Published
261
Efforts to Preserve Joint Army Useless
262
Retention of Nuclear Weapons Encouraged
263
Learn How to Reach an Understanding with Russia
264
Political Bloc Considers Signing CIS Rules Treason
265
Nationalists Reject Russian Cooperation Accord
267
Ukrainian Cabinet Statement Defends Economic Union with Russia Belarus
268
Further Russian Pressure Expected
269
Further Kravchuk Plyushch Comments on Russian Military Doctrine
270
Kravchuk on Intent to Possess HighPrecision Arms
271
Dubininled Delegation Arrives in Kiev for Talks
273
No Change in Stance on CIS Security System
274
Kuchma Writes to Shevardnadze on Cooperation CIS
276
Declaration on Prospects for Cooperation Between Ukraine Georgia
277
Kuchma to Sign Trade Economic Pact in Moscow
279
Ukraine Abstains from Joining CIS Customs Union
280
Kuchma News Conference Discusses Current Issues
281
Moroz Says Ukraine Will Never Join NATO
282
Further on Agreement
287
Text of Black Sea Fleet Agreement
288
Concern over Nuclear Fuel Deliveries from Russia
289
Kuchma Too Early for Customs Union
290
Yeltsins Edict on Links with CIS Assessed
291
Udovenko Seen Rallying Other CIS States Against Moscow
292
Alternative Confederal Concepts Introductory Notes
293
RussiaBelarus Axis
294
Economic Treaty with Belarus Issued Agreement
296
New Comprehensive Union Created with Belarus
297
Security Commission Chairman on Treaty
298
Communique Notes Importance of Ties
299
Country Quietly Leaving Ruble Zone
300
Popular Front Warns Against ProRussian Orientation
301
Shumeyko Predicts Increased Integration with CIS
302
Lukashenka Favors Pragmatic Relations with Russia
303
Lukashenka Urges Unification of Slavic States
304
Hryb Sees Russian Unification as Unconstitutional
305
Press Release Embassy of the Republic of Belarus to the United States of America
306
Article Criticizes Customs Pact with Russia
307
Upbeat on RussianBelarusian Relations
308
Opposition Leader Promises to Sever Moscow Ties
309
Russia Reintegration Support Seen Falling Away
310
Grachev Early to Talk About Coalition
311
Reportage on Russian President Yeltsins TwoDay Visit
312
MoscowMinsk Border Military Agreements Hailed
314
Parliamentary Elections and Referendum in Belarus
315
Foreign Minister of Belarus on the Results of the Referendum
316
Caution Advised on Unification Moves with Belarus
317
The Slavic Union
318
Russian Economists Do Not Approve of Slavic Union
319
Slav Assembly Meets Adopts Party Platform
321
Slavic Union Union with Russia Urgent
322
Three Parties Sign Appeal for Reunification of Slav Lands
323
Shakhray Sees ThreetoFourState CIS Confederative Nucleus
324
Creation of Slav Union Viewed
325
National Patriots Urge Restoration of Slav Union
326
Zhirinovskiy Proposes Slav Economic Union
327
Industrialists Support Slav Union Plus Kazakhstan
328
Nazarbaev Proposes Confederative Treaty
330
Nazarbaev Statement at News Conference Moscow Ostankino Television 16 April 1993
332
Russian Central Asian Leaders Hold Summit Ties Viewed
333
Karimov Comments on CIS EuroAsian Union
335
Foreign Minister Rejects Eurasian Union Proposal
339
Eurasian Union For and Against
340
Nazarbaev Struggles to Push Eurasian Union
347
Skepticism Toward Eurasian Union Idea Noted
349
Ministry Official Rejects Nazarbaev Proposal on Union
350
Integration Among Central Asian States at New Level
360
Central Asian Economic Zone Viewed
361
President of New Central Asian Bank Interviewed
362
Akaev Trilateral Central Asian Union Active
363
Uzbek Kyrgyz Kazakh Presidents Sign Accords
364
Official Outlines Functions of Interstate Council
365
The Debate on Economic Integration Introductory Notes
367
Ivan Zhagel Izvestiya 27 December 1991
370
Kazakhstans Nazarbaev Favors Ruble Zone
371
Ruble Zone Agreement Problems Viewed
372
Interstate Bank Accord Unlikely to Be Ready for CIS Summit
373
Kiev Moscow Agree on New Rules for Banking Economic Relations
374
Republics Fail to Meet Export Commitments to Russia
375
Leaders to Sign Economic Union Declaration
376
Karaganda Conference Aims at Economic Commonwealth
377
Importance of Economic Cooperation Viewed
378
Republics Sign Statement on Economic Integration
379
Kebich Says Union Open to All the CIS
380
CIS Executive Secretary on Economic Union
381
Russian Decree on Credits to Former Soviet Republics
383
On the Statement by the Governments of Belarus the Russian Federation and Ukraine on Urgent Measures to Deepen Economic Integration
385
Barriers to RussianKazakh Economic Integration Assessed
386
CIS Economic Union Concept Advocated
387
Nazarbaev Views Results
389
Convertible Local Currencies Could Settle RussiaCIS Debts
390
Problems of Transnational Enterprises in CIS Discussed
391
Moscow Blamed for Kazakhstans Decision Not to Join Ruble Zone
392
Committee to Explore Creation of CIS Monetary System
395
Supranational Body to Coordinate CIS Economic Policies
396
Outlook for CIS Economic Union
397
Guidelines for CIS Economic Committee Agreed
403
Kiev Against CIS Common Strategic Space
404
Economic Union Augurs Reintegration of CIS States
405
Moscow Seen Regaining Former Authority in CIS
406
Nazarbaev on Setting Up Interstate Economic Committee
407
Yeltsin Message to Interstate Economic Committee Presidium
408
End to Concessions in Trade Sphere Warned
410
Russia Kazakhstan Belarus Sign Accord
411
Ukraine Abstains From Joining CIS Customs Union
412
Kuchma Too Early for Customs Union
413
On Constitutional and Parliamentary Processes Introductory Notes
414
Working Group Coordinator on CIS Charter Interview
415
Proposals for Resolving Constitutional Status of CIS
418
Snegur Moldova Will Not Subscribe to CIS Charter
419
Disagreements May Prevent Signing of CIS Draft Charter
420
National Democratic Forces Critical of New CIS Charter
421
Ukrainian Government Declines to Sign
422
CIS Charter Seen as Rejected for Political Reasons
424
Deputy Prime Minister Rejects Draft CIS Charter
425
Three States Refuse to Sign
426
Kazakh Parliament Ratifies CIS Charter on 14 April
427
Further on CIS Charter Ratification
428
Georgian Parliament Votes to Join CIS Charter
429
Khasbulatov on New Confederation
430
Document on Aligning Legislation in CIS States
431
Participants Cited on Petersburg Interparliamentary Assembly
432
Russia to Sponsor CIS Laws at Interparliamentary Assembly
433
CIS Interparliamentary Assembly Meets in St Petersburg Shumeyko Views Tasks
434
Shumeyko Argues CIS Court Not Necessary
435
Report on CIS Interparliamentary Assembly Council Session
437
Future UN Role as Main Peacekeeper in CIS Considered
439
The Military Evolution Introductory Notes
441
Comparison of Military Reform Plans Charted
444
Armed Forces Keystone
447
Transitional Period Needed
448
Defense Officials View Meeting
449
Kravchuk Interviewed Upon Arrival
450
Shaposhnikov Answers Questions
451
Shaposhnikov Views Future Role of the Armed Forces
452
Kravchuk on Disputes with Russia CIS Armies
453
Committee Debates CIS Collective Security Treaty
456
Expert Sees Hawks Win on Russian Military Doctrine
458
Vorontsov Military Doctrine Allows Peacekeeping
459
CIS Armed Forces Command Abolished
464
Shikhmuradov Signs NATO Partnership for Peace Program
466
Grachev Gives Overview of Military Doctrine
467
Samsonov on CIS Collective Security Concept
469
Further on Samsonov Comments
470
CIS General on Military Cooperation
472
Report Views CIS Defense Issues
474
CIS Military Integration Prospects Viewed
478
PFP Viewed as Waiting Room Before Joining NATO
481
NATO Bishkek to Make Cooperation More Active
482
Further on Prudnikov Comments
483
Kozyrev Addresses Ambassadors Federation Council on CIS
484
Sixteen Plus One Talks Open in Brussels
485
Agreement with NATO to Set Up Contacts
486
Marchuk Partnership Does Not Mean Joining NATO
487
Conceptual Provisions of a Strategy for Countering the Main External Threats to Russian Federation National Security
491
New Defense Doctrine Would Stem NATO Expansion
498
Provisions May Underlay New Military Doctrine
499
NATO Delegation Examines PFP Participation Option
500
Snegur Country Cannot Become NATO Member
501
The Formal Structure of the CIS
503
Major CIS Structural Agreements and Protocols Introductory Notes
505
101 Charter of the Commonwealth of Independent States 22 January 1993
506
Statement by the Council of Heads of States Belonging to the CIS
511
103 Protocol on Economic Relations Published
512
Trade Economic Cooperation Accord
513
Foreign Debt Agreement
514
Agreement on the Former USSRs Internal Debt
517
CIS Treaty on the Formation of an Economic Union
518
Russia Belarus Kazakhstan Sign Customs Union Agreement
522
Commonwealth Countries Sign Payment Union Agreement
523
Commonwealth States Sign Agreement on Aid to Refugees
526
1011 Agreement on the Powers of the Highest Bodies of the Commonwealth of Independent States on Questions of Defense
527
CIS Agreement on Guarding of Borders
529
CIS Agreement on Strategic Forces
530
CIS Agreement on the Status of the Border Troops
531
Strategic Forces Status Agreed
532
General Purpose Forces Agreement
535
Agreement on Defense Budget
536
CIS Agreement on Joint Armed Forces for the Transitional Period
537
CIS Statute on Joint Command of Border Troops
538
Declaration on Rejecting Use of Force
539
Tashkent Statement on Armed Forces Cutbacks
540
Treaty on CIS Collective Security Published
541
Text of Declaration on State Borders
542
CIS Unified Air Defense Agreement
543
Treaty on Border Protection Between CIS NonCIS States
546
The Russian Bloc Hegemony Cooperation and Conflict
549
Appendices
557
CIS Hot Spots Chronologies of Key Events Introductory Notes
559
The GeorgiaAbkhazia Conflict
578
The NagornoKarabakh Conflict
597
The MoldovanTransDniester Conflict
621
The Tajikistan Conflict
645
Chronologies of Key CIS Developments 19921995 Political Economic Security Introductory Notes
663
1992
664
1993
676
1994
704
1995
740
1996
776
CIS Data Political Chronology of CIS Member States National Currencies Energy Dependency in the CIS
777
List of Key CIS Officials
778
Country Profiles
780
Republic of Armenia
781
Economic Statistics
782
Demographic Statistics 1989
783
Political Profile
784
Azerbaijani Republic
785
Economic Statistics
786
Demographic Statistics 1989
787
Political Profile
788
Republic of Belarus
789
Economic Statistics
790
Demographic Statistics 1989
791
Political Profile
792
Republic of Georgia
793
Economic Statistics
794
Demographic Statistics 1989
795
Political Profile
796
Republic of Kazakhstan
797
Economic Statistics
798
Demographic Statistics 1989
799
Political Profile
800
Republic of Kyrgyzstan
801
Economic Statistics
802
Demographic Statistics 1989
803
Political Profile
804
Republic of Moldova
805
Economic Statistics
806
Demographic Statistics 1989
807
Political Profile
808
Russian Federation
810
Economic Statistics
811
Demographic Statistics 1989
813
Political Profile
814
Political Profile
815
Economic Statistics
816
Demographic Statistics 1989
817
Political Profile
818
Republic of Turkmenistan
819
Economic Statistics
820
Demographic Statistics 1989
821
Political Profile
822
Ukraine
823
Economic Statistics
824
Demographic Statistics 1989
825
Political Profile
826
Republic of Uzbekistan
827
Economic Statistics
828
Demographic Statistics 1989
829
Useful Addresses Telephone and Fax Numbers Addresses Telephone and Fax Numbers of Ministries
831
Addresses Telephone and Fax Numbers of CIS Embassies and Consulates in the United States
834
Bibliography
837
General Subject Index
839
Name Index
855
Geographic Index
861
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxvi - Deputies are chosen by the electors on the basis of universal, equal and direct suffrage by secret ballot.
Page 22 - Article 6 The member-states of the Commonwealth will co-operate in safeguarding international peace and security and in implementing effective measures for reducing weapons and military spending. They seek the elimination of all nuclear weapons and universal total disarmament under strict international control. The parties will respect one another's aspiration to attain the status of a non-nuclear zone and a neutral state. The...
Page 22 - Article 3. The high contracting parties, desiring to promote the expression, preservation and development of the ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious individuality of the national minorities resident on their territories, and that of the unique ethno-cultural regions that have come into being, take them under their protection. Article 4. The high contracting parties...
Page 23 - ... for members of the services and their families. ARTICLE 7 The high contracting parties recognize that within the sphere of their activities, implemented on the equal basis through the common co-ordinating institutions of the Commonwealth, will be the following: co-operation in the sphere of foreign policy; co-operation in forming and developing the united economic area, the common European and Eurasian markets, in the area of customs policy; co-operation in developing transport and communication...
Page 22 - Treaty, further described as the high contracting parties, conclude that the USSR has ceased to exist as a subject of international law and a geopolitical reality. Taking as our basis the historic community of our peoples and the ties...
Page 14 - ... in the International Monetary Fund, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
Page 26 - ... that the strengthening of the relations of friendship, good neighbourliness and mutually advantageous cooperation, which has deep historic roots, meets the basic interests of nations and promotes the cause of peace and security; being aware of their responsibility for the preservation of civilian peace and inter-ethnic accord; being loyal to the objectives and principles of the agreement on the creation of the Commonwealth of Independent States...
Page 22 - The member-states of the community will preserve and maintain under united command a common military-strategic space, including unified control over nuclear weapons, the procedure for implementing which is regulated by a special agreement. They also jointly guarantee the necessary conditions for the stationing and functioning of and for material and social provision for the strategic armed forces. The parties contract to pursue a harmonized policy on questions of social protection and pension provision...
Page 23 - ARTICLE 10 Each of the high contracting parties reserves the right to suspend the validity of the present agreement or individual articles thereof, after informing the parties to the agreement of this a year in advance.

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