A Treatise on Harmony: With Exercises, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Boston Music Company, G. Schirmer, Jr., 1912 - Harmony
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Page xxxi - Cole .60 7 Exercises for Training of the Boy's Voice E. Douglas .60 8 Position and Action in Singing Ed. J. Myer 1.25 9 Vocal Reinforcement " 1.50 10 The Renaissance of the Vocal Art "1.25 11 Elementary Violin Lessons E. Gruenberg 1.50 12 School of Trio Playing.
Page 361 - The most important part of his theory, and that which most distinguishes it, is its division of styles into Strict or Diatonic, and Free or Chromatic, and the discussion of the fundamental discords which can be used without preparation. His explanation of the 'Chromatic system' was quite new, and his prefatory remarks so well explain his principles that they may be fitly quoted. After pointing out that the laws of diatonic harmony had been so stretched to apply them to modern styles that they seemed...
Page 361 - The reason why the tonic, dominant, and supertonic are chosen for roots is, because the harmonics in nature rise in the same manner; first the harmonics of any given note, then those of its fifth or dominant, then those of the fifth of that dominant, being the second or supertonic of the original note.
Page 361 - ... since the harmonics of a root note give the notes which form with it the combinations he calls fundamental discords. 'The harmonics from any given note arc a major third, perfect fifth, minor seventh, minor or major ninth, eleventh, and minor or major thirteenth.
Page 365 - This interval should not be inverted, because the upper note being a secondary harmonic and capable of belonging only to the secondary root, should not be beneath the lower, which can only belong to the primary root.
Page xxxi - Apprentice SERIES I Net 1 Treatise on Harmony, Part I JH Anger 1.25 \a Treatise on Harmony, Part II " 1.25 \b Treatise on Harmony, Part III...
Page xxxi - Bach .75 13 The Organ Accompaniment of the Church Service HW Richards 1.25 14 The Plain-Song Service E. Douglas .60 15 Practical Harmony S, Macpherson 2.00 150 Appendix to Practical Harmony " 1.25 15* Questions on Harmony " .60 16 Form in Music, with especial reference to the Designs of Instrumental Music " 2.00 17 The Rudiments of Music " .75 \7a Questions and Exercises upon the Rudiments of Music " .75 18 Practical Counterpoint " 2.25 19 Music and its Appreciation " 1.50 20 The Technique of the...
Page xxi - Skriabin's efforts to draw distinct parallels between the seven colors of the spectrum and the seven notes of the European scale acted as a pseudo-scientific basis for his investigations into the possibilities of total art; but in his attempt to create "visual music" he was not alone as he had certain affinities with NK Metner (Medtner), Rachmaninov and above all Chiurlienis.
Page 373 - ... in nature rise in the same manner; first the harmonics of any given note, then those of its fifth or dominant, then those of the fifth of that dominant, being the second or supertonic of the original note. The reason why the harmonics of the next fifth are not used, is because that note itself is not a note of the diatonic scale, being a little too sharp, as the fifth of the supertonic, and can only be used as part of a chromatic chord.
Page xxi - A stopped pipe gives a note an octave lower than an open pipe of the same length. The amount of the vibrating plate which is allowed to move also determines the pitch of a note.

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