Child-life in Egypt (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Union Press, 1866 - Egypt - 308 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 36 - God,' he says, as he goes along with his water-skin on his shoulder. It is impossible to hear this cry without thinking of the Lord's words to the woman of Samaria, ' If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink ; thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water.
Page 32 - This may seem fanciful ; but the effect of light in these regions is difficult to describe to those who have not seen it ; and evening after evening we watched the circling flight of the doves, and always observed the same appearance. "Though ye have lien among the pots, yet shall ye be as the wings of a dove covered with silver, and her feathers with yellow gold.
Page 24 - The chariots shall rage in the streets, they shall justle one against another in the broad ways : they shall seem like torches, they shall run like the lightnings.
Page 32 - It was beautiful to see these birds, rising clean and unsoiled, as doves always do, from the dust and dirt in which they had been hidden, and soaring aloft in the sky till nearly out of sight among the bright sunset clouds.
Page 31 - A little before sunset, numbers of pigeons suddenly emerge from behind the pitchers and other rubbish, where they have been sleeping in the heat of the day, or pecking about to find food. They dart upwards, and career through the air in large circles, their outspread wings catching the bright glow of the sun's slanting rays, so that they really resemble shining
Page 31 - ... in connection with this. A little before sunset, numbers of pigeons suddenly emerge from behind the pitchers and other rubbish, where they have been sleeping in the heat of the day, or pecking about to find food. They dart upwards, and career through the air in large circles, their outspread wings...
Page 187 - If a son shall ask bread of any of you that is a father, will he give him a stone?
Page 36 - It is very likely that water, so invaluable, and so often scarce, in hot countries, was in those days spoken of, as now, as the "gift of God," to denote its preciousness: if so, the expression would be exceedingly forcible to the woman, and full of meaning.
Page 156 - But in spite of the odd mixture of new and old clothes, rags and finery, there was a certain grace which seemed inherent in them all. Every Egyptian girl knows how to put on a veil : if you lend her an old table-cloth, she will, with one turn of her hand, throw it round her in the most graceful folds possible, and wear it as no European child can manage to do.
Page 43 - No recruiting sergeant was ever half so pleased with a handful of future soldiers, for it was beating up for recruits for the Lord ! Each was now asked her name in turn, and then who had made her, to which the older ones replied, "Allah

Bibliographic information