Oliver Twist: Or, The Parish Boy's Progress (Google eBook)

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Richard Bentley, 1838
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Oliver Twist is a book that was staged in the 1800s. It was written by the well-known author, Charles Dickens who was born on February 7, 1812, in Landport, England. Dickens has written 15 novels and hundreds of short stories, and is known as one of the greatest novelists of the Victorian period. Oliver Twist is the story of a boy named Oliver whose mother died just after his birth, immediately making him an orphan. Until age nine Oliver stayed at a poorly run home for orphans, and was then taken to stay at a workhouse for adults. Here he was forced by the other boys to ask for more food, which enraged the parish beadle, Mr. Bumble. Bumble offered 5 pounds to anyone who would take Oliver off of his hands. After barely escaping becoming an apprentice for a brutal chimney sweep, Oliver became the apprentice of Mr. Sowerberry, an undertaker. Another apprentice of Mr. Sowerberry’s, named Noah Claypole, bullied Oliver and talked about his deceased mother, causing Oliver to become enraged and attack Noah. Mr. Sowerberry believed that Oliver didn’t have a motive for the attack, and he beat Oliver, which is one reason Oliver decided to run away to London.
After arriving in London, the exhausted and starved Oliver meets a young boy his age, named Jack. Jack buys Oliver a meal and tells him that he knows a place that Oliver can stay for free. He brings Oliver to a place where several boys and girls stay, including Jack himself, under their benefactor named Fagin. Little does Oliver know that the group was criminals who trained young orphans to become pickpockets. He goes through a few days of training and is then sent on his first pickpocketing mission, along with two other boys. Oliver becomes terrified when he sees the boys take a handkerchief from an elderly man, and runs away. However, this makes him look more suspicious and he is caught and blamed for the crime. Luckily, the elderly man, named Mr. Brownlow, does not press charges, and police find out the actual criminals. Mr. Brownlow takes Oliver, who is sick with fever at this point, to his house and nurses him back to good health. During Oliver’s time at his house, Mr. Brownlow notices that Oliver looks extremely similar to a woman in one of his portraits in his house. Oliver prepares to stay at Mr. Brownlow’s house but one day while he was out on the street, two people who work for Fagin force him back into Fagin’s control.
After keeping Oliver locked up for a little while Fagin forced Oliver to accommodate Sikes in a burglary. Oliver got caught and was shot in the arm by a servant of the house. He was later taken in by the owner of the house, Mrs. Maylie, whom called a doctor for him and took care of him. Mrs. Maylie and her adopted niece Rose grew very keen of Oliver and he spent a summer with them in the countryside. However, Fagin and an odd man named Monks planned to capture Oliver. At this point of the story it is revealed that Oliver’s mother left behind a gold locket when she died, which had been stolen and pawned, but gotten back. Monks destroyed the locket, which had a wedding ring with the name ‘Agnes’ engraved on it inside. When the Maylies came to London, Nancy secretly met up with Rose and told her about Fagin’s plans. However, a member of Fagin’s group overheard the conversation and relayed the message to Sikes. He became furious and viciously murdered Nancy, then fled London. After all of his guilt and an angry mob of people attacked him, he tried to escape, but accidentally hung himself.
The Maylies reunite Oliver with Mr. Brownlow. He goes to Monks and demands to know the truth about Oliver’s past. Monks reveals that he is Oliver’s half brother. Their father, Mr. Leeford, was forced by his family to marry Monk’s mother, whom was very wealthy. Mr. Leeford was very unhappy in this marriage and had an affair with Oliver’s mother, Agnes Fleming. Monks wanted to capture and kill Oliver to ensure that he would not receive any of their father’s inheritance. Mr. Brownlow forces Monks to allow Oliver his share of inheritance. It
 

Contents

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III
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IV
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Popular passages

Page 283 - If the law supposes that,' said Mr. Bumble, squeezing his hat emphatically in both hands, 'the law is a ass— a idiot. If that's the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is, that his eye may be opened by experience— by experience.
Page 296 - The noise subsided, and he was asked if he had anything to say why sentence of death should not be passed upon him.
Page 159 - Stop thief! Stop thief! The cry is taken up by a hundred voices, and the crowd accumulate at every turning. Away they fly, splashing through the mud, and rattling along the pavements: up go the windows, out run the people, onward bear the mob, a whole audience desert Punch in the very thickest of the plot, and, joining the rushing throng, swell the shout, and lend fresh vigour to the cry, 'Stop thief! Stop thief!
Page 9 - The terrible descriptions were so vivid and real, that the sallow pages seemed to turn red with gore, and the words upon them to be sounded in his ears as if they were whispered in hollow murmurs by the spirits of the dead.
Page 25 - ... reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above. All the pens in the centre of the large area: and as many temporary...
Page 301 - One time he raved and blasphemed, and at another howled and tore his hair. Venerable men of his own persuasion had come to pray beside him, but he had driven them away with curses. They renewed their charitable efforts, and he beat them off.
Page 198 - Then, spare my life, for the love of Heaven, as I spared yours," rejoined the girl, clinging to him. " Bill, dear Bill ! you cannot have the heart to kill me ! Oh, think of all I have given up only this one night for you. You shall have time to think, and save yourself this crime. I will not loose my hold. You cannot throw me off. Bill, Bill ! for dear God's sake, for your own, for mine, stop before you spill my blood. I have been true to you ; upon my guilty soul I have.
Page 161 - The very intelligence that shone in her deep blue eye, and was stamped upon her noble head, seemed scarcely of her age, or of the world; and yet the changing expression of sweetness and good humour, the thousand lights that played about the face, and left no shadow there; above all, the smile, the cheerful, happy smile, were made for Home, and fireside peace and happiness.
Page 112 - You've over-fed him, ma'am. You've raised a artificial soul and spirit in him, ma'am unbecoming a person of his condition: as the board, Mrs. Sowerberry, who are practical philosophers, will tell you. What have paupers to do with soul or spirit? It's quite enough that we let 'em have live bodies. If you had kept the boy on gruel, ma'am, this would never have happened.

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