The cotton plant: its history, botany, chemistry, culture, enemies, and uses (Google eBook)

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Govt. Print. Off., 1896 - Cotton - 433 pages
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Page 36 - Champior or their assigns, he or they paying freight for the said goods, three farthings per pound primage and average accustomed.
Page 61 - As soon as the frost is out of the ground and the soil in workable condition in the spring, a heavy application of superphosphate of lime should be made and raked in.
Page 18 - India trees bearing, as it were, flocks or bunches of wool ; that the natives made linen garments of it, wearing a shirt which reached to the middle of the leg, a sheet folded about the shoulders, and a turban rolled round the head ; and that the linen made by them from this substance was finer and whiter than any other.
Page 21 - In upper Egypt, towards Arabia, there grows a shrub, which some call gossypium, and others xylon, from which the stuffs are made, which we call xylina. It is small, and bears a fruit resembling the filbert, within which is a downy wool, which is spun into thread. There is nothing to be preferred to these stuffs for whiteness or softness: beautiful garments are made from them for the priests of Egypt.
Page 300 - ... fundamental differentiation is entirely abandoned, the American school of petrology, at least, no longer thinking that an igneous rock should receive different names and be assigned to two or more systematic positions on account of fortuitous circumstances of solidification. One looks with especial eagerness for the discussion of the various theories which have been advanced to account for the origin of the earth. The full discussion of the accretion or "planetissimal...
Page 17 - And further, there are trees which grow wild there, the fruit whereof is a wool exceeding in beauty and goodness that of sheep.
Page 35 - The four southernmost States make a great deal of cotton. Their poor are almost entirely clothed in it in winter and summer. In winter they wear shirts of it, and outer clothing of cotton and wool mixed. In summer their shirts are linen, but the outer clothing cotton. The dress of the women is almost entirely of cotton manufactured by themselves, except the richer class, and even many of these...
Page 35 - Province adopted, unanimously, a plan for the encouragement of arts 'and manufactures, including resolutions of nonimportation, and, " that all persons having proper land ought to cultivate and raise a quantity of flax, hemp, and Cotton, sufficient not only for the use of his own family, but to spare to others on moderate terms.
Page 35 - Their poor are almost entirely clothed with it in winter and summer. In winter they wear shirts of it and outer clothing of cotton and wool mixed. In summer their shirts are linen, but the outer clothing cotton. The dress of the women is almost entirely of cotton, manufactured by themselves, except the richer class, and even many of these wear a great deal of homespun cotton. It is as well manufactured as the calicoes of Europe.
Page 18 - Theophrastus describes the trees, from which the Indians make cloths, as " having a leaf like that of the black mulberry, the whole plant resembling the dog-rose. They set them in the plains arranged in rows, so as to look like vines at a distance." Nearchus described the natives as having garments made with this tree-wool, " which reached to the middle of the leg, a sheet folded about the shoulders, and a turban rolled round the head :" a description which would apply to many of them in the present...

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