The Ashgate Research Companion to Japanese Music

Front Cover
Alison Tokita, Dr. David W. Hughes
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2008 - Music - 446 pages
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This is the first book to cover in detail all genres of Japanese music including court music, Buddhist chant, theatre music, chamber ensemble music and folk music, as well as contemporary music and the connections between music and society in various periods. The book is a collaborative effort, involving both Japanese and English speaking authors, and was conceived by the editors to form a balanced approach that comprehensively treats the full range of Japanese musical culture.
  

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Contents

Context and change in Japanese music
1
history of gagaku and shomyo
35
music of gagaku and shomyo
49
Shichi no Bongo
75
The musical narrative of The Tale of the Heike
77
The Kyushu biwa traditions
105
of the Tamana region of Kumamoto Prefecture
109
music from the medieval theatre
127
3ag The different positioning of various musicians on
238
Popular music before the Meiji period
261
while the protagonist in a dream eats drinks and
267
from local to national to global
281
taiko shakuhachi two shamisen
287
transcription
294
The music of Ryukyu
303
The music of the Ainu
323

The shakuhachi and its music
145
Edoperiod chamber music
169
music of the bunraku puppet theatre
197
more than meets the eye
229
l0 lad Geza music 2323
232
Popular music in modern Japan
345
Westerninfluenced classical music in Japan
363
Bibliography
383
AudioVideography
421
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Alison Tokita is Associate Professor in the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Australia. David W. Hughes is Senior Lecturer in Ethnomusicology, Department of Music, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, UK. Jacket illustration: Kindly supplied by Kunitachi College of Music, Japan, with permission from Professor Takeuchi Dokei. From the Takeuchi Dokei collection of colour woodblock prints. The picture is also to be found in Kunitachi College of Music Bibliography and Index Series 20, Kunitachi College of Music Library, 1994, Number 505, which also provides the following information about the illustration: 'Title of picture: Three courtesans playing sankyoku - the ensemble of kokyu, shamisen and koto (Meigi sankyoku awase). A three panel nishiki-e coloured woodblock print by Utagawa Fusatora (Utagawa Hiroshige III), 1869. In the background of the right-hand part of the picture can be seen the first Western-style hotel built in Japan. The text in the picture reads: Hotel building - the area is 42 ken (83.5 yards or 76.4 metres) wide by 40 ken (79.6 yards or 72.2 metres) deep; the roof height is 9 jobar; and 4 shaku (31.8 yards or 30.9 metres).'

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