With courage and cloth: winning the fight for a woman's right to vote

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National Geographic, Aug 10, 2004 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 111 pages
14 Reviews
The photo-illustrated history With Courage and Cloth tells the story of how women fought for and won the right to vote in the United States. Over the course of seven compelling, fact-filled chapters-"Parade," "Rights," "Momentum," "Protest," "Prison," "Action," and "Victory"-the story of a brave struggle unfolds, showing how women used the democratic system that excluded them in order to become full voting citizens of their nation. The book starts with basic history on the struggle for women's rights, other groups' battles for the vote, and background on the 19th-century women's suffrage movement before focusing on the ultimately successful 20th century efforts to enfranchise women. It details and illustrates the political lobbying and public protests organized by women's groups led by suffragists like Alice Paul and the backlash against these efforts, including intimidation, imprisonment, hunger strikes, and forced feeding of prisoners. The book explains how support for women's suffrage grew, leading to the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1919, and the battle to get it ratified by three-fourths of the nation's 48 states. An afterword includes a discussion of the evolution of voting rights and women's rights since 1920, including the efforts to pass an equal rights amendment. This political struggle for equal rights under the law makes for an exciting story that demonstrates democracy in action and how people have worked to improve the system.The story of how half the U.S. population earned voting rights is an important chapter in American history, and it is told here in a comprehensive and straightforward way that has not been done before for children. The great suffrage leaders don't tend to be household names, but their deeds have impact in every home and in every community on Election Day and in the political process throughout the year. The political influence of women can be seen in concrete ways even today: For example, if women hadn't won the vote, Bob Dole would have been elected President of the United States in 1996. Carrying cloth banners and with determined spirits, American women marched, picketed, and paraded tirelessly until they were heard and their rights were inscribed into the Constitution of the United States. Author Ann Bausum illustrates her gripping text with more than 50 period photographs and illustrations combed from archives at the Library of Congress, the National Women's Party, and more. These photographic treasures, some never before published, bring the suffragists and their crusade to life.

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Review: With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman's Right to Vote

User Review  - Audrey Rozman - Goodreads

This book provides insight into a part of American History that is not always touched on within textbooks. The hardship and inspiring courage that is revealed throughout the accounts provided within ... Read full review

Review: With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman's Right to Vote

User Review  - Michael Eisenmayer - Goodreads

This book was alright. I was very interested to see the struggle women went through to win th right to vote. Te bad of the book was how slow it moved along I wish it was told as more of a story. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
CHAPTER
17
CHAPTER THREE
27
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Ann Bausum is the daughter of a history professor, and she grew up with a love of American history and a passion for research. This award-winning author has published several books for National Geographic Books, including the acclaimed reference book. Our Country's First Ladies. Another of her titles. Freedom Riders, was named a Sibert Honor Book. She lives in Beloit, WI.

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