American History: For Use in Secondary Schools (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1908 - History - 557 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Contents

Geographical advantages of the French colonies
10
8 The Indian tribes II
11
Indians By MacNeil
12
Life and character of the Indians
13
General relations of Indians and Whites
14
Help given to the English by the Indians
15
Results of Indian wars
16
13 Connection between the history of Europe and America
17
Political Europe after 1450
18
Trade with the East before 1475
19
Search for new sea routes to India
20
Summary
21
CHAPTER II
24
Columbuss first voyage
25
Sir Walter Ralegh
36
CHAPTER III
40
The English Puritans
46
Captain John Smith 41 A Puritan By St Gaudens
51
Political problems and dangers
52
SECTION FAGE 51 New Haven
56
Northern New England
57
The charter of Maryland 1632
59
The proprietor and the freeman
60
Summary
61
CHAPTER IV
63
England and the Colonies 16601685
64
New York in the XVII Century New Amsterdam
66
New Netherland and its neighbors
67
The English in New York 16641685
68
65 New Jersey and the Quakers
69
Penn and his colony
70
The government of Pennsylvania
71
Boundaries of Pennsylvania
72
Bacons rebellion 1676
74
The Carolina charters 16631665
75
King Philips war 16751676
77
Massachusetts and the Crown 16751684
78
The revolution of 1689 in England and New England
80
Revolutionary movements in the Middle and Southern Colonies
82
Results of the revolution in America
83
The colonies in 1700
84
RIVALRY OF FRENCH AND ENGLISH 16891763
86
Champlain
87
Exploration of the West
88
Louisiana 16991720
89
Georgia
91
The English colonists and their governors
92
Government of the French colonies
93
Preparation for the final conflict
94
The first period of the war 1754175 7
97
The second period of the war 17581760
98
The Peace of Paris 1763
99
Summary
101
CHAPTER VI
104
Classes of society 5
105
Indented servants
106
Colonial life
108
Agriculture no 102 Commerce and shipping
111
Industry and labor
112
Colonial currency
113
The professions 1145
114
106 Colonial churches 107 Superstition
115
SECTION PAGE 108 Crime
117
Education
118
Newspapers
120
in Travel
121
Colonial government
122
Colonial law
123
THE FORMATION OF A UNION 17631789
127
115
128
Englands control through colonial officials
129
Control of colonial legislation
130
9 Early acts of trade 16601696
131
Later Restrictive Legislation 16961760 32
132
General effect of the commercial system
133
The writs of assistance
134
123
135
George III and his ministers 17601782
136
The establishment of a colonial army 1763
137
The Sugar Act of 1764
138
The Stamp Act
139
Reception of the Stamp Act
140
The Stamp Act congress
141
The repeal of the Stamp Act
142
3 English and American ideas of representation
143
The Townshend Acts 1767 144
144
Growing disorder 17681770
146
The committees of correspondence 17721773 47
147
The first United States flag
159
A Continental bill
166
Benjamin Franklin
174
SECTION PAGE 399
175
Nathanael Greene
181
70 Claims and negotiations 1782
184
Provisions of the Treaty of Peace 1783
185
Summary
186
CHAPTER IX
189
The league of states
190
The amendment of the Articles of Confederation
191
Land claims of the states
193
Land cessions 17811802 194 181 Ordinances for the government of western territory 195 182 The West and foreign affairs
196
Relations with Great Britain 197 184 Internal disorder
198
The Connecticut compromise
201
Later history of the convention
202
Feeling of the people
203
Ratification of the Constitution by the states
204
The nation and the states
205
i92 Congress
206
The courts
207
196 The sources of the Constitution
208
Beginnings of the new congress
210
99 The executive departments
212
Alexander Hamilton
213
SECTION PAGE 200 The national judiciary
214
CHAPTER X
218
The frontier
219
The admission of new states
220
The movement toward emancipation
221
The cotton gin and slavery
222
207 Voters and officeholders
223
Religious freedom
224
210 Commerce
225
Industry
226
Currency
227
Improved means of communication
228
22S
229
PART III
231
Financial Policy and Political Parties 17901793
233
Assumption of state debts
234
New national taxes
235
The United States bank
236
The formation of political parties
237
Grievances against England 1794
239
Jays treaty 1794
240
John Jay
241
The close of Washingtons administration
242
225
244
The Kentucky and Virginia resolutions 1798
245
The election of 1800
246
Jefferson and his party
247
Reversal of Federalist practices The national courts 799
250
231
252
The impressment of American seamen
259
Orders and decrees 18061807
260
The Embargo 1807
261
Indirect results of the Embargo
262
The NonIntercourse Act 1809
264
259 260 260 262 263 264265
265
A NEW NATIONAL SPIRIT 18111824 269294
269
War in the North 18121813
270
The war on the ocean 18121814
272
The last year of the war
273
The Treaty of Ghent 1814
274
The Missouri problem
285
The Missouri Compromises 18201821
286
Florida
288
The Monroe Doctrine 1823
289
Summary
291
CHAPTER XIII
295
New political parties
297
The election of Jackson 1828
298
New political methods
300
The spoils system
301
The WebsterHayne debate 1830
303
Changes in the tariff 18241832
304
The South and the tariff
305
Nullification and the compromise tariff
306
Overthrow of the bank
308
Government revenues and the panic of 1837
310
Administration of Van Buren 18371841
311
Tyler and Whigs 18411842
313
Summary
314
CHAPTER XIV
317
The era of canals
318
2S6 The telegraph and other inventions 522
322
Industrial changes after 1810
323
The era of free trade 18461857
324
289 Opening of the government lands
325
Development of Democracy
326
Changes in the states
328
Social legislation
329
American cities
331
Foreign immigration
333
The admission of new states
334
Early abolitionists
335
Abolition and petition 18351840
336
THE STRUGGLE OVER SLAVERY 18431877
339
Oregon territory to 1846
343
War with Mexico 18461847
344
Conquest of California Peace
346
Oregon Territory election of 1848
348
California
349
The elements of a compromise 1850 35
350
3io Discussion of the compromise
351
3 Completion of the compromise of 1850 35 2
352
The KansasNebraska bill 1854
356
326
364
Lincoln The Three Months
380
Conditions Affecting Union Success
386
SECTION PAGE 344 Southern finances and government
393
Critical situation at the North 394
394
Summary
395
CHAPTER XVII
399
Grants campaign in the West to February 1862
401
349 Completion of the Western Tennessee campaign
403
New Orleans 1862
404
The theater of war in Virginia
405
352 Monitor and Merrimac
407
355 Events leading to emancipation
411
Emancipation
412
357 Chancellorsville Lees second invasion
414
Vicksburg
416
Operations around Chattanooga 1863
418
Naval operations 1864
419
The advance on Atlanta 1864
421
Grant in Virginia MayJuly 1864
422
The Close of the War July 1864April 1865
423
Sherman in Georgia and the Carolinas 366 The end of the
424
The people and Lincolns government
426
Summary of the campaigns
427
39 Conclusion
428
CHAPTER XVIII
431
37 The problem of reconstruction
432
373
434
Freedmen legislation
436
Civil rights bill and amendment XIV 1866 437 376 Military reconstruction 18671870
438
378
441
City government and corruption
442
The administrations of Grant 18691877
443
National political scandals m
444
382
445
Changes in the written Constitution
448
Changes in the unwritten constitution 386 The national government 387 New national industrial conditions 448 449
449
THE NEW NATION 18651907
453
Bonds and taxes after the war 454 390 The greenbacks
455
Laws relating to silver 456 392 Business after the war
457
393 Agriculture and the West
458
Development of the West by means of the railways 460 395 Railway abuses
461
The granger movement and railway legislation 462 397 The interstate commerce commission 1887
463
398 Garfield and Arthur
464
The election of Cleveland 1884
465
The spoils system and reform
467
Progress of civil service reform since 1883
468
Reform of elections
469
Changes affecting the presidency Summary 465 467 468 469
470
39
471
405 Treatment of the Chinese
474
The Mormons
475
Proposed reform of the tariff 18821888
476
The election of 1888
477
The McKinley tariff 1890
478
The GormanWilson Tariff the income tax 1894
479
The Dingley tariff 1897
480
The freesilver movement in the West
482
Election of 1896
483
Republican policies
484
Italy and Chile 1891
486
PanAmerican affairs
488
The United States in the Pacific
489
The United States and European interference
491
The dispute over the boundary of Venezuela 1895
492
Settlement of Venezuela controversy
493
Summary
494
CHAPTER XXI
497
426 Our relations with Cuba before 1895
498
The United States and Cuban insurrection 18951896
499
SECTION PAGE 428 Dangers to American interests in Cuba 18971898
500
Situation during the spring of 1898
501
The beginning of war
502
War on the Atlantic
504
War finance
506
Army administration and reform
507
The treaty of Paris 18981899
509
Philippine insurrection and the election of 1900
510
The Philippines since 1900
511
Efforts to obtain an isthmian canal before 1901
514
Arrangements for constructing a canal
515
Securing a satisfactory route for the canal
516
Problems of construction importance of canal
518
Relations with Cuba
519
Alaska
520
Arbitration
521
Summary
522
CHAPTER XXII
525
448 Industrial progress since 1880
526
Antitrust legislation in the states
528
The Sherman AntiTrust Law of 1890
529
Recent antitrust activity
531
Railway rate regulation
532
Commerce and shipping 526 528 529 53i 532533
533
454 Prosperity and panics since 1865
534
Labor unions and strikes 18771886
535
The Pullman strike 1894
536
Recent labor controversies
537
458 Population 1900 Immigration
538
New states and new state constitutions
540
Changes in the suffrage and other state laws
541
Urban and Total Population 17901900
544
The Irrigation law 1902 and its application
547
APPENDIX
i
162
xx
67
xxx
176
xxxvii
162
xliii
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xv - The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State. SECTION. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion ; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the...
Page iii - He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.
Page xiv - No person held to service or labour in one State, under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labour, but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such service or labour may be due. Section 3. New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other State ; nor any State be formed by the junction of two or more...
Page viii - Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law appoint a different Day.
Page 143 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Page v - NEW YORK William Floyd Philip Livingston Francis Lewis Lewis Morris NEW JERSEY Richard Stockton John Witherspoon Francis Hopkinson John Hart Abraham Clark PENNSYLVANIA Robert Morris Benjamin Rush Benjamin...
Page xii - States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them by Ballot the Vice President. The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.
Page 150 - Legislatures, where their right of representation can alone be preserved, in all cases of taxation and internal polity, subject only to the negative of their Sovereign, in such manner as has been heretofore used and accustomed.
Page 291 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting as a principle in which the rights, and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page viii - Time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office.

References from web pages

JSTOR: American History for Use in Secondary Schools
AMERICAN HISTORY FOR USE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. By Roscoe Lewis Ashley. The macmillan Company, London. 1909. The tone and temper of this work are to be ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0043-5597(191007)1%3A19%3A1%3C68%3AAHFUIS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-O

Bibliographic information