The Guide to the Stage: Containing Clear and Ample Instructions for Obtaining Theatrical Engagements, with the List of Provincial Theaters ... and a Clear Elucidation of All the Technicalities of the Histrionic Art. To which is Added a List of the London Theaters, and Copies of Their Rules and Articles of Engagement ... with Addtional Information, Making it Applicable to the American Stage ... Also, a List of the American Theaters. and Copies of Their Rules and Articles of Engagement (Google eBook)

Front Cover
S. French, 1861
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 33 - ... object, as shields opposed against it. One foot is drawn back behind the other, so that the body seems shrinking from the danger, and putting itself in a posture for flight.
Page 33 - ... little forward, the feet equal; spreads the arms, with the hands open, as to receive the object of its longings. The tone of the voice is eager and unevenly, inclining to that of joy, but curbed by a degree of doubt and anxiety. Desire differs from hope as to expression, in this particular, that there is more appearance of doubt and anxiety in the former than in the latter. For it is one thing to desire what is agreeable, and another to have a prospect of actually obtaining it.
Page 75 - ... inflamed. An idiot smile, a ridiculous surliness or affected bravado, disgraces the bloated countenance. The mouth open, tumbles out nonsense in heaps, without articulation enough for any ear to take it in, and unworthy of attention, if it could be taken in. The head seems too heavy for the neck. The arms dangle from the shoulders, as if they were almost cut away, and hung by shreds. The legs totter, and bend at the knees, as ready to sink under the weight of the reeling body. And a general incapacity,...
Page 77 - Modesty, or submission, bends the body forward; levels the eyes, to the breast, if not to the feet, of the superior character. The voice low; the tone submissive; and words few.
Page 33 - ... as to receive the object of its longings. The tone of the voice is eager and unevenly, inclining to that of joy, but curbed by a degree of doubt and anxiety. Desire differs from hope as to expression, in this particular, that there is more appearance of doubt and anxiety in the former than in the latter. For it is one thing to desire what is agreeable, and another to have a prospect of actually obtaining it. Desire expresses itself by bending the body forward, and stretching the arms toward the...
Page 40 - Kean details with awful reality: his eye dilates and then loses lustre; he gnaws his hand in the vain effort to repress emotion; the veins thicken in his forehead; his limbs shudder and quiver, and as life grows fainter, and his hand drops from between his stiffening lips, he utters a cry of expiring nature, so exquisite that I can only compare it to the stifled sob of a fainting woman, or the little wail of a suffering child.
Page 23 - ... to attend on the Stage. The Manager is not to be applied to in that place, on any matter of business, or with any personal complaint. For a breach of any part of this article, fifty cents will be forfeited.
Page 34 - ... in a menacing manner, against the object of the passion. The eyes red, inflamed, staring, rolling, and sparkling ; the. eyebrows drawn down over them ; and the forehead "Wrinkled into clouds. The nostrils stretched wide ; every vein swelled ; every muscle strained ; the breast heaving, and the breath fetched hard. The mouth open, and drawn on each side toward the ears, shewing the teeth in a gnashing posture.
Page 35 - Seriousness, the mind fixed upon some important subject, draws down the eyebrows a little, casts down, or shuts, or raises the eyes to heaven; shuts the mouth, and pinches the lips close. The posture of the body and limbs is composed, and without much motion. The speech, if any, slow and solemn ; the tone unvarying. Inquiry, into an obscure subject, fixes the body in one posture, the head stooping, and the eye poring, the eyebrows drawn down.
Page 32 - Tranquillity, or apathy, appears by the composure of the countenance, and general repose of the body and limbs, without the exertion of any one muscle. The countenance open ; the forehead smooth; the eye-brows arched; the mouth just not shut; and the eyes passing with an easy motion from object to object, but not dwelling long upon any one.

Bibliographic information