Peter Parley's Universal history, on the basis of geography (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1871
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Contents

Combat of David and Goliath
42
The Reign of David Wisdom of Solomon
44
Building of the Temple Visit of the Queen of Sheba
46
The West Indies continued 494
49
The Decline of the Jewish Nation
50
The Hebrew Prophets
53
Crucifixion of the Saviour Destruction of Jerusalem
56
Cyrus conquers Babylon His Death
59
Reign of Cambyses
62
Expedition of Xerxes into Greece
64
Affairs of Persia till the Saracen Conquest
67
Modern History of Persia
70
Early History of China
73
Anecdotes of the Chinese Emperor
75
Cities of China Manners of the Chinese
78
Origin of the Arabs Rise of Mahomet
81
Sequel of the History of the Saracens
84
About Syria Phoenicia and Asia Minor
87
A brief View of Several Nations
91
Review of the History of Asia
94
Chronology of Asia
98
Cbiy Paoz 100 About the Saracens How the Turks overturned the Sara
100
About the Geography of Africa The Inhabitants
101
Early Sovereigns of Egypt
104
Egyptian Architecture and Sculpture
107
The Ptolemies and Queen Cleopatra
110
Sequel of the Egyptian History
114
Summary of Ethiopian Matters
116
Origin of the Barbary States and their Piracies on the Christians
118
Fables and Facts about Africa
121
Chap Paok 47 History of the Slave Trade
123
Chronology of Africa
125
Introductory Remarks on its Geography and other Matters
127
Abont Greece Where it is situated Appearance of the Country Climate
132
The Extent of Greece First Settlement of the Country
134
The Grecian Lawgivers
137
War with Persia
139
Affairs of Athens
141
Beginning of the Theban War
144
Sequel of the Theban War
146
Grecian Religion or Mythology
149
The Grecian Philosophers
152
The Grecian Philosophers continued
154
Something more about Philosophers About the Greek Poets
157
About the Mode of Life among the ancient Greeks
160
Philip of Macedon conquers Greece
164
Conquests of Alexander the Great
167
Sequel of Alexanders Career
169
Greece invaded by the Gauls or Kelts
172
End of Grecian Independence
174
Modern History of Greece
176
Chronology of Greece
179
About Italy as it now is
180
Founding of Rome by Romulus Its Early State
183
Battle of the Horatii and Curiatii
187
From the Reign of Ancus Martius till the Expulsion of the Kings
189
The Story of Coriolanus
194
Rome invaded by the Gauls The First Punic War 195 75 Second and Third Punic Wars
198
Chap Page 76 Scipios Triumph
200
Sylla and Marius
203
Cneus Pompey and Julias Ctesar
205
Caesar usurps the Supreme Power
207
Assassination of Julius Caesar
209
Consequences of Caesars Death
211
About the great Power and Extent of the Roman Empire in the Time of Augustus
213
The means by which Rome acquired its Power
216
Rome under the Emperors
219
Fall of the Western Empire of the Romans
221
Progress of the Decline of Bome
224
Manners and Customs of the ancient Romans
227
About Religion Deities Temples Marriage
229
About Funeral Rites and Ceremonies
232
Roman Farms Mode of Ploughing Farmhouses Grain Cattle Superstitions of the Farmers Gardens Vines
236
Country Houses Description of Plinys Villa Aqueducts
239
Military Affairs of the Romans Division of the Army The Imperial Eagle Music Arms Dress Military Rewards Crowns The Triumph
243
About Naval Affairs The War Galley Commerce Shows
246
of Wild Beasts Exhibitions of Gladiators 246 94 Sports Chariot Racing The Circus Carriages Private Entertainments Supper Rooms Convivial Parties ...
249
About Theatres Clocks and Watches The Fine Arts Books and Writing Costume Conclusion
252
Rome under the Popes
255
About the former Italian States
259
Chronology of Rome
261
About the Ottoman Empire Turkey in Europe Turkey in Asia About the Climate People and other things
263
cen Empire How the Ottoman Turks founded the Otto man Empire About Bajazet Timour and others
266
Sequel of the Turkish History
269
Early History of Spain The Moorish Conquest
272
The Gauls Origin of the French Nation
295
About Clovis and Little King Pepin
297
The Reign of Charlemagne i
299
About the Crusades or Holy Wars
302
About the Feudal System
305
About Chivalry or KnightErrantry
310
More about Chivalry 813
313
King Philip and Pope Boniface Wars of the French and English
316
The Reigns of several French Kings
320
The Reigns of Louis the Great and his Successor
322
The French Revolution
325
The Rise of Napoleon Bonaparte
329
The Fall of Bonaparte
330
Recent Affairs of France
332
CBip PA0H 126 Abont Germany
338
About the ancient Tribes of Germany Charlemagne e
340
Affairs of Switzerland
343
Sequel of the German History
346
About Austria Hungary c
348
About Hungary Bohemia the Tyrol c
351
About Prussia
353
History of Prussia
355
Chronology of Germany Austria Hungary and Prussia
358
Description of Russia
359
Description of Russia continued
362
The Reign of Peter the Great
365
The Successors of Peter the Great
367
About Sweden
370
Charles the Twelfth and his Successors
373
About Lapland Norway and Denmark
375
Brief Notices of several Kingdoms and States 378
378
Chronology of Russia Sweden Lapland Norway Denmark Holland Belgium c
382
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
384
About London and other cities of England Wales Scot land and Ireland
386
Origin of the British Nation The Druids
388
Saxon and Danish Kings of England
391
Norman Kings of England
393
English wars and Rebellions
396
The Lancastrian Kings of England
399
Wars of the Roses
402
Reigns of the Tudor Princes
404
The Reign of Elizabeth
405
Accession of the House of Stuart
410
Wars of the King and Parliament
412
The Protectorate and the Restoration
416
Chap Paob 157 The Revolution of 1688 and other Matters
418
The Hanoverian Kings of Great Britain
421
The Story of Wales
424
The Story of Scotland
427
About Ireland
431
Matters and Things
434
Chronology of Great Britain
437
Review The Dark Ages Important Inventions c
439
General Chronology of Europe
445
AMERICA
447
About America
448
The first Inhabitants of America
452
Discovery of America by Columbus 454 169 A few words about Iceland and Greenland Settlements of the French in America
457
The French Colonies conquered by the English
461
Description of the United States
463
Settlement and Colonial History of New England
465
Affairs of New England continued
467
Early History of Virginia
470
Settlement of the other Colonies
472
Causes which led to the Revolution
473
The American War
475
Affairs of the United States since the Revolution
477
General Remarks upon the History of the United States 480 180 About South America El Dorado and the Fountain of Youth
482
History of the Mexican Territories Guatimala
484
Spanish Peruvian Territories
487
Account of the Brazilian Territories
489
The West Indies
491
About Oceania The Malaysian Islands
502
The Australian Divisions of Oceania
504
Polynesia The Sandwich Islands
510
Story of the Bounty concluded
512
Chronology of Oceania
515
Duration of Empires Asia Africa 515 195 Duration of Empires continued Europe
520
Ancient Names of Countries c
527
The Origin and Progress of Government
530
Architecture Agriculture Gardening
541
Commerce
546
Painting Sculpture and Music
557
Dates of Discoveries and Inventions
561

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 541 - ... more refined posterity. 3. Thus the Egyptian style of building derived its origin from the cavern and mound; the Chinese from the tent ; the Grecian from the wooden cabin; and the Gothic from the bower of trees.
Page 73 - Chinese empire is nearly the same at the present day that it has been from the earliest records. It is bounded on the north by Asiatic Russia, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, and on the south by the Chinese Sea and Farther India. On the west there are mountains and sandy deserts, which divide it from Thibet and Tartary. 2. This empire is very ancient, and has continued longer than any other that has evei existed.
Page 271 - Vali, or general governor, who is held to represent, the Sultan, and is assisted by a council, is placed at the head of each government. The provinces and districts are subjected to inferior authorities, under the superintendence of the principal governor. All subjects, however humble their origin, are eligible to, and may . fill, the highest offices in the state. Birth confers no privilege, as all true believers are equal in the eye...
Page 22 - ... endeavoured to prevent this misfortune by a very curious contrivance. In the first place, she ordered three thousand brown oxen to be killed. 4. The hides of the dead oxen were stripped off, and sewed together in the shape of elephants. These were placed upon camels, and, when the camels were drawn up in battle array, they looked pretty much like a troop of great brown elephants. Doubtless the king of the Indies wondered where queen Semiramis had caught them. 5. When the battle was to be fought,...
Page 102 - Europeans ; for the greater part of the inhabitants are negroes, of which there are many tribes. Some of these are intelligent, and live tolerably well, but the greater part are either in a savage or a barbarous state. 4. The climate being warm they need little shelter or -clothing. Their houses are therefore poor huts, or slight tenements made of leaves or branches of trees.
Page 312 - ... 10. Besides this, the knights were required always to tell the truth, and always to perform their promises ; they were expected to be full of generosity and courage, and never to be guilty of any act of meanness. They were, in short, expected to devote themselves to the cause of humanity, and remedy, as far as in their power, the injustice and violence which belonged to the age in which they lived.
Page 220 - ... murdered his mother and his wife. He set Rome on fire, merely for the pleasure of seeing it blaze. While the city was in flames, he sat on the top of a lofty tower, playing on a harp. Finally, he was dethroned, and condemned to be beaten to death with rods. To escape this torture, he killed himself.
Page 215 - Romans built many public works of great utility ; they constructed roads paved with stone ; they built durable bridges, and made aqueducts for supplying the cities with water. So numerous and so permanent were these vast works, that the remains of them are still to be found in most of those countries over which the Roman dominion was then established, though they were executed nearly two thousand years ago. 9. But, of all the cities in the world, Rome was itself the most wonderful. In the time of...
Page 232 - ... friend. 3. The body of the dead was bathed in perfumes, dressed in rich garments, and laid out on a couch strewed with flowers. The outer door of the house was shaded with branches of cypress. According to the heathen mythology, Charon would not convey the departed spirit across the Styx without payment of a fixed toll. A small coin was therefore placed in the mouth of the deceased, to meet this demand.
Page 259 - I. of Savoy. King Carlo Alberto the first of the house of Savoy-Carignano, abdicated the throne March 23, 1849, in favour of his son, the present king.

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