The Return of the Indian

Front Cover
Harper Collins, 1986 - Juvenile Fiction - 208 pages
29 Reviews
Omri can hardly contain his excitement when he wins first prize in a national writing contest. But he feels he must share the good news with Little Bear, his miniature Indian friend who inspired the winning entry. Omri isn't prepared for what he finds when he ventures back into the cupboard that magically transforms the plastic toy into a real live Iroquois Indian.

Desperate to help Little Bear, Omri must find a way to transport himself to the world of the Native Americans. In the process he learns a lot about these amazing people, as well as about himself.

  

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Review: The Return of the Indian (The Indian in the Cupboard #2)

User Review  - Jake - Goodreads

Very good book but Read full review

Review: The Return of the Indian (The Indian in the Cupboard #2)

User Review  - Morgaine Stanwood - Goodreads

It's a really good book, and *spoiler* it was kind of mean of Little Bear to call Matron "Beaver Face" This was just as good as the first one. Read full review

Contents

A Defeat
1
A Victory
9
The Way It Began
17
The Sweet Taste of Triumph
24
From Dangerous Times
30
Going for Help
40
Matron
51
The Operation
60
A Death and a Healing
105
Red Men Red Coats
115
Corporal Fickits
123
Ifn Ya Wanna Go Back
131
As Far As You Can Go
140
Algonquin
151
The Terror of the Battle
158
Invasion
167

A good Luck Piece
68
Boones Brain Wave
77
Target Omri
87
The Troops
96
Battle of the Skinheads
177
Epilogue by the Fire
184
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 32 - ... his head and arms hanging on one side of the horse, and his legs on the other...
Page 1 - Hove" on the street sign on the corner, making it "Hovel Road." Omri thought grimly that this was much more appropriate than "Hove," which sounded pleasantly like somewhere by the sea.
Page 10 - Her eyes and mouth were wide open and she was staring at him as if she'd never seen him before. He sat up straight, his heart beating. "What's up?
Page 23 - The whole business nearly blew Omri's mind every time he thought at all deeply about it.
Page 67 - When he could unfreeze, he went to the window and looked out. All he could see was Kitsa sitting on the sill.
Page 61 - By this time it was one o'clock in the morning and the...

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About the author (1986)

Lynne Reid Banks was born in London, England on July I929. After studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she acted and wrote for the repertory stage.Eventually, she turned to journalism, becoming one of Britain's first female television news reporters. Banks was fired from her job as a reporter, and while working a different job, she wrote her first novel, which went on to become a best seller. Her titles include Fair Exchange, Tom Country, The Spice Rack, and Polly and Jake.