History of Scientific Ideas: Being the First Part of The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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John W. Parker and Son, 1858 - Science
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Page 292 - Secondly, such qualities which in truth are nothing in the objects themselves, but powers to produce various sensations in us by their primary qualities, ie by the bulk, figure, texture, and motion of their insensible parts, as colours, sounds, tastes, &c.
Page 55 - Words convey the mental treasures of one period to the generations that follow ; and laden with this, their precious freight, they sail safely across gulfs of time in which empires have suffered shipwreck, and the languages of common life have sunk into oblivion.
Page 34 - It being that term which, I think, serves best to stand for whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a man thinks, I have used it to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking; and I could not avoid frequently using it.
Page 292 - Qualities thus considered in bodies are, first, such as are utterly inseparable from the body, in what estate soever it be ; such as in all the alterations and changes it suffers, all the force can be used upon it, it constantly keeps; and such as sense constantly finds in every particle of matter which has bulk enough to be perceived, and the mind finds inseparable from every particle of matter, though less than to make itself singly be perceived by our senses...
Page 60 - If any one does not clearly comprehend this distinction of necessary and contingent truths, he will not be able to go along with us in our researches into the foundations of human knowledge; nor, indeed, to pursue with success any speculation on the subject.'^ In the following passage we are told what the distinction is, the non-recognition of which incurs this denunciation.
Page 150 - The axiom just noted that what is true up to the limit is true at the limit...
Page 25 - Parallelograms upon the same base and between the same parallels, are equal to one another.
Page 285 - ... of the greatest. When he counts his little wealth, he finds he has in his hands coins which bear the image and superscription of ancient and modern intellectual dynasties, and that in virtue of this possession acquisitions are in his power, solid knowledge within his reach, which none could ever have attained to if it were not that the gold of truth once dug out of the mine circulates more and more widely among mankind.
Page 155 - The lever, the pulley, the wheel, and axle, the inclined plane, the wedge, and the screw.
Page 273 - You sometimes speak of gravity as essential and inherent to matter. Pray do not ascribe that notion to me, for the cause of gravity is what I do not pretend to know, and therefore would take more time to consider of it.

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