Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and Psychoanalysis

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Wisdom Publications, Jan 15, 2005 - Philosophy - 224 pages
2 Reviews
Is meditation an escape from--or a solution to--our psychological problems? Is the use of antidepressants counter to spiritual practice? Does a psychological approach to meditation reduce spirituality to "self-help"? What can Zen and psychoanalysis teach us about the problems of the mind and suffering?

Psychiatrist and Zen teacher Barry Magid is uniquely qualified to answer questions like these. Written in an engaging and witty style, Ordinary Mind helps us understand challenging ideas--like Zen Buddhism's concepts of oneness, emptiness, and enlightenment--and how they make sense, not only within psychoanalytic conceptions of mind, but in the realities of our lives and relationships.

This new paper edition of Magid's much-praised book contains additional case study vignettes.

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Review: Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and Psychoanalysis

User Review  - Bodhi47 - Goodreads

It was good. It was published some time ago when he was one of the first to conflate zen and psychiatry. And he does keep them separate. Adjunct and useful together but doesn't recommend both automatically for each student or patient. Liked it better than I thought I would. Read full review

Review: Ordinary Mind: Exploring the Common Ground of Zen and Psychoanalysis

User Review  - Mike Porter - Goodreads

This book was written for a therapist, not for the lay person...like me! Although I found parts of it quite interesting, the author has written if from the perspective of a doctor and a zen teacher, and he is both. Read full review

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Barry Magid is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst practicing in New York City, and the founding teacher of the Ordinary Mind Zendo, also in New York. He is the author of the Wisdom titles Ordinary Mind and Ending the Pursuit of Happiness.

Charlotte Joko Beck was an American Zen teacher, founder of the Ordinary Mind Zen School, and author of Everyday Zen: Love and Work and Nothing Special: Living Zen. She is remembered for teaching her students to work with the emotions of everyday life, rather than attempting to escape them, and produced many Dharma heirs who are practicing psychologists and psychiatrists. She passed away in 2011, at the age of 94.

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