Recent Advances In Spray Combustion: Spray Atomization and Drop Burning Phenomena, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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AIAA, 1996 - Combustion - 505 pages
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Contents

Review of Principles of Optical Techniques for Particle Size Measurements
3
Theory and Measurement of the Multipoint Statistics of Sprays
33
Intra and Interlaboratory Experiments to Assess Performance of Phase Doppler Interferometry
57
Subject Area 2 Breakup Processes of Liquid Jets and Sheets
107
Regimes of Jet Breakup and Breakup Mechanisms Physical Aspects
109
Regimes of Jet Breakup and Breakup Mechanisms Mathematical Aspects
137
Aerothermodynamic Effects on Liquid Jet Breakup in TwoFluid Fuel Nozzles
161
Effect of Internal Flow Conditions Inside Injector Nozzles on Jet Breakup Processes
173
Measurement of Drop Sizes in Unsteady Dense Sprays
297
Deliberations on the Dynamics and Core Structure of Reacting Sprays at Elevated Pressures
309
Generation Vaporization and Combustion of Droplet Arrays and Streams
327
Fundamentals of Dynamics and Evaporation in Clusters of Drops Embedded into Vortices
381
FarField Coalescence Effects in Polydisperse Spray Diffusion Flames
399
Subject Area 4 Supercritical Evaporation and Burning of Liquid Propellants
411
Droplet Behavior at Supercritical Conditions
413
Supercritical Evaporation and Combustion of Liquid Oxygen in an Axisymmetric Configuration
439

Measurement of Core Structure of Coaxial Jets Under ColdFlow and HotFire Conditions
185
Theoretical Modeling of Liquid Jet and Sheet Breakup Processes
211
Atomization of Liquid Sheets
241
Subject Area 3 Dense Spray Behavior
261
Nonintrusive Measurement of the Structure of Dense Sprays
263
Modeling of Atomization and Secondary Breakup from First Principles
481
Author Index
505
PROGRESS IN ASTRONAUTICS AND AERONAUTICS SERIES VOLUMES
507
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