The Courting of Marcus Dupree

Front Cover
Univ. Press of Mississippi, Oct 1, 1992 - Biography & Autobiography - 463 pages
11 Reviews
At the time of Marcus Dupree's birth, when Deep South racism was about to crest and shatter against the Civil Rights Movement, Willie Morris journeyed north in a circular transit peculiar to southern writers. His memoir of those years, North Toward Home, became a modern classic. In The Courting of Marcus Dupree he turned again home to Mississippi to write about the small town of Philadelphia and its favorite son, a black high-school quarterback. In Marcus Dupree, Morris found a living emblem of that baroque strain in the American character called "southern."

Beginning on the summer practice fields, Morris follows Marcus Dupree through each game of his senior varsity year. He talks with the Dupree family, the college recruiters, the coach and the school principal, some of the teachers and townspeople, and, of course, with the young man himself. As the season progresses and the seventeen-year-old Dupree attracts a degree of national attention to Philadelphia neither known nor endured since "the Troubles" of the early sixties, these conversations take on a wider significance. Willie Morris has created more than a spectator's journal. He writes here of his repatriation to a land and a people who have recovered something that fear and misdirected loyalties had once eclipsed. The result is a fascinating, unusual, and even topical work that tells a story richer than its apparent subject, for it brings the whole of the eighties South, with all its distinctive resonances, to life.

  

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Review: The Courting of Marcus Dupree

User Review  - Kate Neylon - Goodreads

Willie Morris gives such vivid descriptions of both the people and terrain in my home state. An inside view of college recruiting 40+ years ago in dirt poor MS. Read full review

Review: The Courting of Marcus Dupree

User Review  - RJ - Goodreads

A brilliant chronicle that draws its strength from its deep-rooted context -- much like the tall, ancient oaks of Mississippi gather strength from the nutrients of their soil, marshaling it upward. Read full review

Contents

Preface
11
More Than Football Itself
15
Red Hill Peregrinations
20
The Marcus Legend
33
The Basement Is Not Deep
59
Moist Talcum and Drugstore Perfume
74
Tensions
86
the Real the Sad the Bizarre
92
He Runs Wild
260
Possum in the Hollow
273
Choctaw Bowl
291
Open Season for Courtiers
306
Snowbound in Neshoba
311
Big Money
332
Sojourn in Texas
337
Football Fratricide
347

A Dollar to a Doughnut
126
Summer of Darkness
152
I Run for Both of Us
175
He That Loseth His Life
200
In Residence with My Brother Pete
217
Mississippi
235
The Judge Was Misinformed
252
Philly Appreciates Him
362
Nocturnal Disguises
370
Where Is He?
391
The End of the Affair
404
The Reckoning
421
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Willie Morris is the author of "North Toward Home", "New York Days", "My Dog Skip", "My Cat Spit McGee", and numerous other works of fiction & nonfiction. As the imaginative and creative editor of "Harper's Magazine" in the 1960s, he published such writers as William Styron, Gay Talese, David Halberstam, and Norman Mailer. He was a major influence in changing our postwar literary & journalistic history. He died in August 1999 at the age of sixty-four.

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