Archaeologia Cambrensis (Google eBook)

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Page 247 - I must not leave the truth unstated, that it is again no question of expediency or feeling whether we shall preserve the buildings of past times or not. We have no right whatever to touch them. They are not ours, They belong partly to those who built them, and partly to all the generations of mankind who are to follow us.
Page 247 - Watch an old building with an anxious care ; guard it as best you may, and at any cost, from every influence of dilapidation. Count its stones as you would jewels of a crown ; set watches about it as if at the gates of a besieged city ; bind it together with iron where it loosens ; stay it with timber where it declines ; do not care about the unsightliness of the aid : better a crutch than a lost limb ; and do this tenderly, and reverently, and continually, and many a generation will still be born...
Page 158 - ... difficult. On the top are two stations to visit, where there are also some stone crosses; the first is called 'the eagle's nest' probably from its extreme height for here a person seems to have got into the superior region of the air and it is ascended by the help of some steps cut into the rock, without much difficulty. If the reader can conceive a person poised, as it were, or rather perched on the summit of this pinnacle, beholding the vast expanse of the ocean all around him, except towards...
Page 158 - This kind of a sloping wall is about twelve feet high and the danger of mounting it seems terrible, for if a person should slip, he might tumble on either side of the isthmus down a precipice, headlong, many fathoms into the sea; when this difficult passage is surmounted the remaining part of the way up to the highest summit of the rock is much less difficult. On the top are two stations to visit, where there are also some stone crosses; the first is called 'the eagle's nest...
Page 41 - Neil regnavit annis xxiv.', and thenceforward it contains a short chronicle of Ireland to 1318. These three manuscript chronicles, the Saltair of Cashel, Tiirhernach, and Inisfallen, are written in Irish characters, and in the Irish language intermixed with Latin. They were formerly collected, with many other valuable íMSS. relating to Ireland, by Sir J. Ware, and came first to the Earl of Clarendon, and then to the Duke of Chandos.
Page 158 - ... and several steps in length. Here the devotees, women as well as men, get astride on this rock and so edge forward until they arrive at a stone cross, which some bold adventurer cut formerly on its extreme end; and here having repeated a Pater Noster, returning from thence concludes the penance.
Page 158 - ... remaining part of the way up to the highest summit of the rock is much less difficult. On the top are two stations to visit, where there are also some stone crosses; the first is called 'the eagle's nest' probably from its extreme height for here a person seems to have got into the superior region of the air and it is ascended by the help of some steps cut into the rock, without much difficulty. If the reader can conceive a person poised, as it were, or rather perched on the summit of this pinnacle,...
Page 212 - To him was particularly commended the daughter of the first queen, because she bad the title of princess of Wales ; and therefore he grieved at the contumelies put upon her. He was afterwards put in prison, from which, after a year and three months, he escaped by making a rope out of cloth. I beg you to receive and console him. His exile is long, his misfortune long, and he seems a modest man. Here he has asked for nothing.
Page 158 - This island has been the scene of annual pilgrimages for many centuries, and the service of the Way of the Cross is still celebrated here, though with some perfectly traditional forms of prayer and customs, such as are now only found to exist among the islanders along the west coast of Ireland.
Page 209 - As to the indisposition of the people of Wales, of which mention is made .... I understand they are very angry at the illtreatment of the Queen (Catherine) and Princess (Mary) and also at what is done against the faith, for they have always been good Christians.

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