Scientific Materialism and Ultimate Conceptions (Google eBook)

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Bickers and Son, 1879 - Materialism - 370 pages
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Page 34 - other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin, or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent that they are convertible, as it were, one into another, and possess equivalence of power in their action
Page 196 - of experimental evidence and discern in that matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial life
Page 179 - not imposed upon it by an external artificer; by its own intrinsic force and virtue it brings these forms forth. Matter is not the mere naked empty capacity which philosophers have pictured her to be, but the universal mother who brings forth all things as the fruit of her own womb
Page 146 - He will reason that the sun is he who gives the seasons and the years, and is the guardian of all that is in the visible world, and in a certain way, the cause of all things which he and his fellows have been accustomed to behold.
Page 276 - In Being's floods, in Action's storm, I walk and work, above, beneath ; Work and weave in endless motion! Birth and death, An Infinite ocean; A seizing and giving 'Tis thus at the roaring loom of time I ply, And weave for God the garment thou seest Him
Page 113 - me as a terrier dog does a rat. The shock produced a stupor similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse after the first gripe of the cat. It caused a sort of dreaminess, in which there was no
Page 83 - in all ages meant and now more than ever means, the extension of the province of what we call matter and causation, and the concomitant gradual banishment from all regions of human thought of what we call spirit and spontaneity.
Page 273 - science will admit that its progress in all ages meant, and now more than ever means, the extension of what we call matter and causation, and the concomitant gradual banishment from all regions of human thought of what we call spirit and spontaneity.
Page 134 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem only like a boy playing
Page 163 - Between two worlds life hovers like a staró 'Twixt night and morn upon the horizon's verge ; How little do we know that which we are ! Of time and tide rolls on and bears afar our bubbles

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