Addresses at the Dedication of the Monument Erected to the Memory of Matthew Thornton at Merrimack, N. H., September 29, 1892 (Google eBook)

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Republican Press Association, 1894 - 47 pages
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Page 29 - I have three thousand dollars in hard money; I will pledge my plate for three thousand more; I have seventy hogsheads of Tobago rum, which shall be sold for the most it will bring. These are at the service of the State. If we succeed in defending our firesides and homes, I may be remunerated; if we do not, the property will be of no value to me.
Page 14 - ... that has never flagged, signed the immortal Declaration of Independence, were first among those who initiated the Revolution at Bunker Hill, were first and foremost at the decisive Battle of Bennington, entered into and helped form the American Union, stormed and captured the heights of Lundy's Lane, marched through Baltimore into the jaws of death at Bull Run, and fought till the end at Appomattox. " The world has never seen a more intelligent, loyal, patriotic, resolute race of men than have...
Page 14 - In every crucial struggle of the republic, whether civil or military, legal or legislative, moral or constitutional, New Hampshire has been a master force. Her sons, impelled by a patriotism that has never flagged, signed the immortal Declaration of Independence, were first among those who initiated the Revolution at Bunker Hill, were first and foremost at the decisive Battle of Bennington, entered into and helped form the American Union, stormed and captured the heights of Lundy's Lane, marched...
Page 4 - ... his daughter, Mary, who married Silas Betton of Salem. The state has honored Matthew Thornton by erecting at Merrimack a fine granite monument, six and one half feet square at the base and thirteen feet high. This was formally dedicated with impressive ceremonies September 29, 1892. The shaft bears the following inscription : ' ' In memory of Matthew Thornton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Erected by the state of New Hampshire upon a lot and foundation presented by the...
Page 14 - ... form the American Union, stormed and captured the heights of Lundy's Lane, marched through Baltimore into the jaws of death at Bull Run, and fought till the end at Appomattox. " The world has never seen a more intelligent, loyal, patriotic, resolute race of men than have dominated the soil of New Hampshire since its abdication by the red man. " Small in area, rough and grand in surface, with pure water, vital and health-inspiring air, and peopled with a sturdy race, she has furnished more than...
Page 28 - He was president of the convention called to meet in December, 1775, to establish a form of government for the colony of New Hampshire, and as chairman of a committee appointed by it to draft a form of constitution. This draft was accepted with but slight alteration and became the constitution of the state. On January 10...
Page 24 - ... dreamed of the immortal renown he would secure for himself and the honor he was conferring upon his state, his town and his descendants forever? Doctor Thornton discharged the duties of his important office ably and well. He was a member of the committee of safety almost continuously from 1775 to 1777. In December, 1776, he was again elected to the continental congress for one year, from January 23, 1777. For six years he served on the bench of the Superior Court and was also chief justice of...
Page 21 - ... a leader in that great emergency. When the Revolution broke out he was colonel in command of a company of militia in Londonderry; he also held a commission of justice of the peace under Gov. Benning Wentworth. He had been a member of the colonial assembly in the years 1758, 1760 and 1761, and when the first convention, whose members were regularly chosen in each town and parish in the province, and which met at Exeter May 17, 1775, to deliberate and act upon the condition of affairs, was called...
Page 10 - ... of Representatives as delegate to represent New Hampshire in the continental congress. He did not reach Philadelphia and take his seat in the Congress until November, four months after the passage of the Declaration of Independence. He at once claimed his right and affixed his name to the document, which had been signed by most of the members in August before his election. He was not obliged to do this. It placed his life in greater peril had the cause proved unsuccessful. No doubt he fully realized...
Page 17 - ... prepared to enter upon the practice of his profession he selected the town of Londonderry as his field of labor. Although there was already one physician in the town, Dr. Archibald Clark, who had been there about ten years, it would seem that this was a wise choice on the part of young Doctor Thornton. Londonderry was then an important place in the colony. It was the largest and most populous town in New Hampshire, with the exception of Portsmouth, and it remained so for many years, in fact until...

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