Life of Edmond Malone, Editor of Shakespeare: With Selections from His Manuscript Anecdotes (Google eBook)

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Smith, Elder & Company, 1860 - 476 pages
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Page 356 - The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labours, had it been early had been kind; but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it; till I am solitary and cannot impart it; till I am known and do not want it.
Page 92 - He told him, that he had early laid it down as a fixed rule to do his best on every occasion, and in every company ; to impart whatever he knew in the most forcible language he could put it in ; and that by constant practice, and never suffering any careless expressions to escape him, or attempting to deliver his thoughts without arranging them in the clearest manner, it became habitual to him.
Page 414 - How small, of all that human hearts endure, That part which laws or kings can cause or cure ! Still to ourselves in every place consigned, Our own felicity we make or find : With secret course, which no loud storms annoy, Glides the smooth current of domestic joy.
Page 392 - Johnson) how does he know we will permit him ? The first Duke in England has no right to hold such language.
Page 382 - Mr Gibbon, the historian, is so exceedingly indolent that he never even pares his nails. His servant, while Gibbon is reading, takes up one of his hands, and when he has performed the operation lays it down, and then manages the other the patient in the meanwhile scarcely knowing what is going on, and quietly pursuing his studies.
Page 182 - the most brilliant day of my life, and that which I would most wish to live over again, was the day I appeared at the bar of the House of Lords with the censure of the Commons in my hand.
Page 280 - On this tree when a nightingale settles and sings, The tree will return her as good as she brings.
Page 414 - REMOTE, unfriended, melancholy, slow, Or by the lazy Scheld or wandering Po ; Or onward, where the rude Carinthian boor Against the houseless stranger shuts the door...
Page 169 - It is of all things the most instructive, to see not only the reflection of manners and characters at several periods, but the modes of making their reflection, and the manner of adapting it at those periods to the taste and disposition of mankind. The stage indeed may be considered as the republic of active literature, and its history as the history of that state.
Page 169 - A history of the stage is no trivial thing to those who wish to study human nature in all shapes and positions. It is of all things the most instructive to see not only the reflection of manners and characters at several periods, but the modes of making their reflection, and the manner of adapting it at those periods to the taste and disposition of mankind.

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