The Slayers of Moses: The Emergence of Rabbinic Interpretation in Modern Literary Theory

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SUNY Press, 1982 - History - 267 pages
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In this groundbreaking study, Susan Handelman examines the theological roots of the modern science of interpretation. She defines current structures of thought and patterns of organizing reality, clearly distinguishes them from previously reigning Hellenic modes of abstract thought, and connects them with important elements of the Rabbinic interpretive tradition. Hers is the first comprehensive treatment of the undeniable, and undeniably significant, influence of Jewish religious thought on contemporary literary criticism. Dr. Handelman shows how they provide a crucial link among several of the most influential modern theories of textual interpretation, from Freud to the Deconstructionist School of Lacan and Derrida, as well as current literary theorists who revive Rabbinic hermeneutics, such as Harold Bloom and Geoffrey Hartman.
  

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Contents

Greek Philosophy and the Overcoming of the Word
1
Rabbinic Thought The Divinity of the Text
25
Some Philosophic Aspects of the Rabbinic Interpretive System
49
Escape from Textuality The Fulfiller of Signs
81
The Slayers of Moses Freud Lacan Derrida Bloom and the Dark Side of Displacement
119
The Book of Books and the Book of Nature
121
SolomonSigmund the Son of Jakob
127
The Analyst as Scribe Jacques Lacan and the Return of the Fathers Name
151
Reb Derridas Scripture
161
The Critic as Kabbalist Harold Bloom and the Heretic Hermeneutic
177
Rabbi Ishmaels Rules
223
Glossary
227
Notes
229
Selected Bibliography
249
Index
261
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About the author (1982)

Susan A. Handelman, Assistant Professor of English at the University of Maryland, has published articles on literature, critical theory, and Jewish studies.

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