Paris, and Its Historical Scenes: Revolution of 1789. The Tuileries. The massacre of St. Bartholomew. Sieges of Paris. The Louvre (Google eBook)

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C. Knight, 1831 - Paris (France)
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Page 97 - To make a government requires no great prudence. Settle the seat of power, teach obedience, and the work is done. To give freedom is still more easy. It is not necessary to guide ; it only requires to let go the rein. But to form a free government, that is, to temper together these opposite elements of liberty and restraint in one consistent work, requires much thought, deep reflection, a sagacious, powerful, and combining mind.
Page 57 - Laud be to God ! even there my life must end. It hath been prophesied to me many years, I should not die but in Jerusalem ; Which vainly I supposed the Holy Land. But bear me to that chamber ; there I'll lie ; In that Jerusalem shall Harry die.
Page 290 - I killed one man to save a hundred thousand; a villain to save innocents; a savage wildbeast to give repose to my country. I was a Republican before the Revolution; I never wanted energy.
Page 248 - Tambonnean, in the cloister of Notre Dame, who had been advertised of her situation by her mother, and solicited to afford her protection. She effected her entry into the house without being observed; and being placed in M. de Tambonneau's study, she remained there unmolested during the rest of that day and the greater part of the next. On the evening of Thursday, however, information reached the family that the mob were about to visit them. There was not a moment to be lost ; and the hunted fugitive...
Page 267 - O la belle statue! 6 le beau pie'destal! 'Les Vertus sont a pied, le Vice est a cheval!" Before the Place Louis XV. was quite finished, it was the scene of a catastrophe, memorable for the number of -victims it involved, and for the remarkable occasion of national festivity and rejoicing, over which it threw so sudden and inauspicious a gloom. Never perhaps had any royal marriage been hailed with gladder expectations than that of the unfortunate...
Page 278 - That is no business of mine,' answered the priest, while he refused to receive the manuscript ; ' I am here to conduct you to the scaffold." His majesty then addressing himself to Gobeau, another member of the municipality, requested him to take charge of the paper and to deliver it ; adding, ' You may read it ; it contains some dispositions with which 1 am desirous that the Commune should be acquainted.' I stood behind the King, near the fire-place, when he turned round, and I presented to him his...
Page 247 - This person, however, succeeded in conveying the child, through the midst of numerous dangers, to the house of a relation of Madame de Feuqueres, with whom it remained in safety. But it was now judged advisable that its mother also should as soon as possible leave her present asylum. It was impossible for her to venture to her mother's residence, as a guard, she learned, had been placed around the house. She therefore resolved, as her only resource, to throw herself upon the compassion of a person...
Page 188 - Romish faith, were the duke of Guise and his brother, the cardinal of Lorraine, who were nearly connected with the royal family by the marriage -of their niece, -Mary of Scotland, with the late king, Francis II. The chiefs of highest rank among the...
Page 279 - An hour after vollies of artillery and cries of Vive la Nation ! Vive la Republique ! were heard. . . . The best of kings was no more*.
Page 152 - Elysees, would naturally imagine, from the frisky behaviour and cheerful faces of the company he meets, that this day was a continuation of a series of days appointed for dissipation, mirth, and enjoyment ; he could not possibly imagine that the ground he is walking over was so lately covered with the bodies of slaughtered men ; or that the gay lively people he saw were so lately overwhelmed with sorrow and dismay. I drove to many places in Paris this morning. The epithet royal, which was formerly...

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