The Sociology of Katrina: Perspectives on a Modern Catastrophe

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David L. Brunsma, David Overfelt, J. Steven Picou
Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2007 - Social Science - 282 pages
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A second edition of this textbook is now available. As a disaster, Hurricane Katrina logs in as both the most destructive and instructive when considering the cataclysmic effects, as well as the magnitude of knowledge, that can be drawn from it. This meteorological event became the stimulus for devastating technological failures and widespread toxic contamination, causing the largest internal diaspora of displaced people in recent U.S. history. This book brings together the nation's top sociological researchers in an effort to catalogue the modern catastrophe that is Hurricane Katrina. The chapters in this volume discuss sociological perspectives of disaster literature, provide alternative views and analyses of early post-storm data collection efforts, and examine emerging social questions that have surfaced in the aftermath of Katrina.
  

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Contents

VII
23
VIII
35
IX
51
X
69
XI
71
XII
91
XIII
107
XIV
121
XVIII
173
XIX
189
XX
191
XXI
203
XXII
217
XXIII
235
XXIV
243
XXV
247

XV
123
XVI
141
XVII
155
XXVI
269
XXVII
273
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About the author (2007)

David L. Brunsma is associate professor of sociology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He was the program chair and organizer for the 2006 Annual Meetings of the Southern Sociological Society held in New Orleans shortly after Hurricane Katrina. David Overfelt is a graduate of sociology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is a member of Sociologists Without Borders and focuses on the merging of academia and activism in his work as as a radical public sociologist. J. Steven Picou is professor of sociology and chair in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work at the University of South Alabama in Mobile. He has published numerous articles on environmental sociology, disasters, the sociology of risks, and applied sociology, and is undertaking several projects on the health risks associated with the long-term industrial and social impacts of Hurricane Katrina.

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