As She Climbed Across the Table

Front Cover
Doubleday, 1997 - Fiction - 212 pages
22 Reviews
Philip is in love with Alice. As the novel opens, he is beginning to lose her. Not to another man, as he fears, but to, literally, nothing. Alice is a physicist, and a team at the University where both she and Philip work has created a hole, a vacuum, a doorway of nothingness inside the laboratory. They call it "Lack." Alice becomes obsessed with Lack, as Philip is obsessed by Alice. The novel is at the same time an astute and wise portrait of unrequited love (albeit of a very unusual kind) a hilarious academic parody, a novel of ideas and a social satire. It is utterly original, but in the school of Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, Katherine Dunn, and David Foster Wallace. Passion, humor, yearning and knowledge, blended together in a suspenseful love story that could be characterized as "American Magical Realism." From the Hardcover edition.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
6
3 stars
10
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: As She Climbed across the Table

User Review  - Jasun Horsley - Goodreads

from email to Lethem: Every authentic cry requires a response. The nature of an emptiness is that it echoes, provided the sound reaches all the way to its core. ASCATT is an authentic cry, so, here we ... Read full review

Review: As She Climbed across the Table

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

Lethem seems to be known for "genre-bending", and this one (his third novel, published in 1997) is a good example. Is it sci-fi or American magical realism or...? It's tempting to use the umbrella ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
7
Section 3
23
Copyright

27 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Jonathan Lethem was born in Brooklyn, New York on February 19, 1964. His first novel, Gun, with Occasional Music was published in 1994. His other works include As She Climbed across the Table (1997), Amnesia Moon (1995), The Fortress of Solitude (2003), You Don't Love Me Yet (2007), Chronic City (2009), and Dissident Gardens (2013). He won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Motherless Brooklyn (1999). He also writes short stories, comics and essays. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Rolling Stone, Esquire, The New York Times, The Paris Review, McSweeney's and other periodicals and anthologies.

Bibliographic information