Spectacle de la Nature: Or, Nature Display'd. Being Discourses on Such Particulars of Natural History as Were Thought Most Proper to Excite the Curiosity, and Form the Minds of Youth ... Tr. from the Original French ... (Google eBook)

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L. Davis and C. Reymers, 1766 - Natural history
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Page 203 - And he cried mightily with a strong voice, saying, Babylon the great is fallen, is fallen, and is become the habitation of devils, and the hold of every foul spirit. and a cage of every unclean and hateful bird.
Page 199 - ... in quest of more favourable climates. They all assemble at a certain day, like swallows and quails. They decamp at the same time, and it is very agreeable to observe their flight. They generally range themselves in a long column, like an I, or in two lines united in a point, like
Page 15 - It is eary to fee what Intereft determines her to that Choice. You will never find upon a Cabbage any Eggs of the Caterpillar that eats the Willow ; nor fee upon the Willow the Eggs of any Caterpillar who feeds upon Cabbage. The Moth feeks for Curtains, Woollen Stuff...
Page 223 - The Edifice is vaulted within, like the Handle " of a Bafket, and generally rifes in an oval Figure. " The Dimenfions are proportioned to the Number " of the intended Inhabitants. Twelve Feet in " Length, and ten in Breadth, are fufficient for eight " or ten Beavers ; if the Number increases, they in
Page 14 - Vinegar, there you will difcover a number of little Eels, and never any other Animals, becaufe one particular Creature knows, that Vinegar, or the Materials that compound it, is proper for her Family, and therefore depofits them either in that Matter, or in the Liquor itfelf, and no where elfe.
Page 223 - they ftrike out two Openings to the Stream ; one " conduces them to the Place where they bathe, and " which they always keep very decent ; the other is " a Paflage to that Quarter, where they carry out " every thing that would foil or rot the upper Apart " ments. There is a third Aperture much higher, " calculated to prevent their being fhut up, when the " Ice has dofed the Openings into the lower Lodg
Page 31 - Greek writers, denotes the point of one to the other and with the ends folded back from the left to the right and from the right to the left, and covering the bareness of his neck.
Page 6 - Man can never imitate j to others it performs the Office of a Tongue ; many employ it as a Drill for piercing, and the generality of them ufe it as a Reed for Suction. Several, whofe Heads are fortified with a Trunk, a Saw, or a couple of Pincers, carry in the other extremity of their Bodies an Augur, which they lengthen and turn at difcretion ; and by that means dig commodious Habitations for their Families in the...
Page 199 - ... themfelves in the Caverns of the Earth, riveted to one another with their Claws and Bills. They flock to Places unfrequented by Men, or even bury themfelves in the Water; the Precaution they take to lubricate their Feathers with their own Oil, and to roll themfelves up like a Ball, preferves them in the Water, and even under the Ice. They are there benumbed, and pafs the whole Winter without Motion. . The Heart, however, has a conftant Palpitation, and the Warmth revives them at the Return of...
Page 189 - Beads ; for it is particularly obferved in her, that when fhe is purfued by the Hunters, fhe runs to hide her Head, and particularly her Eyes behind a Tree, all the reft of her large Body is expofed to view ; but as fhe no longer fees the Hunter, fhe wifely imagines he does not fee her, and that therefore fhe has no danger to apprehend. Now this whole abfurd and ridiculous Conduct, the infpired Writer afcribes to her want of that...

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