The Broken Connection: On Death and the Continuity of Life

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American Psychiatric Pub, 1996 - Medical - 495 pages
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The unique human awareness of our own mortality enables us to ensure our perpetuation beyond death through our impact on others. This continuity of life has been profoundly shaken by the advent of wars of mass destruction, genocide, and the ever-present threat of nuclear annihilation. In The Broken Connection, Robert Jay Lifton, one of America's foremost thinkers and preeminent psychiatrists, explores the inescapable connections between death and life, the psychiatric disorders that arise from these connections, and the advent of the nuclear age which has jeopardized any attempts to ensure the perpetuation of the self beyond death.

  

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Contents

The Lost Theme
3
DEATH AND IMMORTALITY
11
Approaches and Modes
13
The Experience of Transcendence
24
The Inchoate Image
36
The Natural Unity of Death
45
Infant and Child
53
Adolescent and Adult
73
SchizophreniaLifeless Life
222
SuicideThe Quest for a Future
239
Yukio MishimaThe Lure of Death
262
DEATH AND HISTORYTHE NUCLEAR IMAGE
281
The Historical Animal
283
Dislocation and Totalism
293
Victimization and Mass Violence
302
Nuclear Distortions
335

Culture and Connection
92
Culture Integrity and Movement
100
DEATH AND EMOTION PSYCHIATRIC BOUNDARIES
113
Love and Energy
115
Anxiety and Numbing
125
Guilt
132
Anger Rage and Violence
147
Survivor Experience and Traumatic Syndrome
163
DepressionStatic Protest
179
Disruption and Neurosis
200
Nuclearism
369
EPILOGUE
389
Awareness and Renewal
391
Seeking the Perfect DeathJapanese Examples
395
Death Imagery in Psychosomatic and Character Disorder
401
Schizophrenia and DeathHistorical Notes
411
Scientists and Nuclearism
419
NOTES
433
INDEX
467
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Robert Jay Lifton is Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The Graduate School, and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New York. He is the author of The Nazi Doctors, Death in Life, and The Life of the Self.

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