Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Apr 1, 2007 - Philosophy - 220 pages
12 Reviews
Not to be confused with the philosophy of mathematics, mathematical philosophy is the structured set of rules that govern all existence. Or, in a word: logic. While this branch of philosophy threatens to be an intimidating and abstract subject, it is one that is surprisingly simple and necessarily sensible, particularly at the pen of writer Bertrand Russell, who infuses this work, first published in 1919, with a palpable and genuine desire to assist the reader in understanding the principles he illustrates. Anyone interested in logic and its development and application here will find a comprehensive and accessible account of mathematical philosophy, from the idea of what numbers actually are, through the principles of order, limits, and deduction, and on to infinity. British philosopher and mathematician BERTRAND ARTHUR WILLIAM RUSSELL (1872-1970) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Among his many works are Why I Am Not a Christian (1927), Power: A New Social Analysis (1938), and My Philosophical Development (1959).
  

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Review: Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

User Review  - Zach Augustine - Goodreads

"For the moment, I do not know how to define "tautology"....It would be easy to offer a definition which might seem satisfactory for a while; but I know of none that I feel to be satisfactory, in ... Read full review

Review: Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

User Review  - Ahsan - Goodreads

Me, in high school, "What exactly are numbers sir?" Math teacher, "...have you done your homework?" This book finally answers the questions that only earned me bewildered looks, and often pity, from ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
11
III
20
IV
29
V
42
VI
52
VII
63
VIII
77
XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
181
XVIII
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IX
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Popular passages

Page 2 - The most obvious and easy things in mathematics are not those that come logically at the beginning; they are things that, from the point of view of logical deduction, come somewhere in the middle. Just as the easiest bodies to see are those that are neither very near nor very far, neither very small nor very great, so the easiest conceptions to grasp are those that are neither very complex nor very simple (using "simple
Page 3 - It must have required many ages to discover that a brace of pheasants and a couple of days were both instances of the number 2: the degree of abstraction involved is far from easy.

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About the author (2007)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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