A History of Iraq

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - History - 324 pages
7 Reviews
In response to current events, Charles Tripp has updated his incisive book A History of Iraq to include developments as recent as mid-2002. Since its establishment by the British in the 1920s, Iraq has witnessed the rise and fall of successive authoritarian regimes, competing ruthlessly for power and resources. This struggle culminated in the dictatorship of Saddam Husain, who still maintains his grip over a fragmented and increasingly isolated society. Tripp's book traces Iraq's political history from its nineteenth-century roots in the Ottoman empire, to the development of the state, its transformation from monarchy to republic and the rise of the Ba'th party and the ascendancy and current rule of Saddam Husain. This is a story of social conflict, of power struggles between rival clans, of hostility and wars with neighboring states, as well as of their aftermath, and Iraq's deteriorating relations with the West. A History of Iraq offers incisive analysis of the making of a modern state and how it creates its own distinctive politics. Charles Tripp is Professor of Politics with reference to the Middle East at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He is the General Editor of the Cambridge Middle East Studies Series and author of A History of Iraq (3rd Edition, CUP, 2007) and Islam and the Moral Economy: the challenge of capitalism (CUP, 2006).
  

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Review: A History of Iraq

User Review  - David Stephens - Goodreads

One of the most difficult aspects of writing history books must be deciding how much detail to include. If the author doesn't go into enough depth, readers can be deprived of substantive information ... Read full review

Review: A History of Iraq

User Review  - Ed Callahan - Goodreads

Tripp's book is well-researched, detailed, and powerfully argues that modern Iraq can only be understood in terms of the patron-client relations, state sponsored organized violence, and religious ... Read full review

Contents

The Ottoman provinces of Baghdad Basra and Mosul
8
The Ottoman reconquest of the three provinces
13
Sultan Abdlhamid II and the Young Turks
20
The Committee of Union and Progress and its opponents
24
The British Mandate
30
British occupation and reactions
31
The Iraqi revolt of 1920
40
The institutional definition of the state
45
Iraqi foreign policy under Qasim
163
The politics of conspiracy and the coup detat of February 1963
167
Bathist control and loss of control in 1963
170
Nasserist aspirations and Iraqi realities
175
Patrimonialism and the rule of the clan
181
a weakening hold on power
185
The Bath and the rule of Saddam Husain
193
Ahmad Hasan alBakr and the consolidation of power
194

Mandate and treaty
52
territory and oil
58
Different communities different purposes different histories
61
Emerging trends in politics and the economy
65
The Hashemite monarchy 193241
77
Communal identities and tribal unrest
79
Social criticism and political conspiracy
84
The coup detat of 1936
88
panArabism and army conspiracies
94
Iraq in the Second World War
99
The coup detat of 1941 and the British military occupation
103
The Hashemite monarchy 194158
108
Reestablishing the regime
110
Thwarted liberalisation
114
Arab issues Palestine and the Portsmouth Treaty
118
Economic development and party politics
127
the politics of reform and repression
132
foreign initiatives and domestic challenges
139
The coup detat of 1958
143
The republic 195868
148
dictatorship and disillusion
149
Kurdish and Shii challenges and relations with Iran
199
Economic patronage political control and foreign policy alignments
205
War in Kurdistan
211
Oil revenues foreign policies and the rise of Saddam Husain
214
Saddam Husains presidency and the war with Iran in 1980
223
Defending the regime and Iraq after 1982
235
A war of attrition 19848
238
Resistance among the Kurds and the Shia
243
The aftermath of war and the invasion of Kuwait 198890
248
The war for Kuwait and the uprisings of 1991
253
Iraq under sanctions and the long aftermath of the Gulf war
259
The resilience of Saddam Husains regime
264
Kurdish autonomy and Kurdish politics
271
The limitations of opposition
275
Conclusion
293
Notes
298
Bibliography
307
Further reading and research
313
Index
317
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About the author (2002)

Charles Tripp is Professor of Politics with reference to the Middle East at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He is the General Editor of the Cambridge Middle East Studies Series and author of A History of Iraq (3rd Edition, CUP, 2007) and Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism (CUP, 2006).

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