In the Valley (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1890 - New York (State) - 427 pages
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Page 401 - More than once during this reverie, be it stated in frankness, the reflection came to me that by merely tipping the canoe over I could even now set everything right Of course I put the evil thought away from me, but still it came obstinately back more than once. Under the momentary spell of this devilish suggestion I even looked at the form recumbent before me, and noted how impossible it was that it should ever reach the bank, once in the water. Then I tore my mind forcibly from the idea, as one...
Page 84 - ... four-footed animals of forbidding aspect, and as such they have since haunted the visions of several generations, young and old, by night and by day. I have just made a pilgrimage to Sydenham to see with my own eyes these famous restorations, and, so far as I can judge, there is nothing like unto them in the heavens, or on the earth, or in the waters under the earth. We now know from good evidence that both...
Page 172 - That is the most depressing thing about Hooker. It seems to me that he is over-confident." One night when Hooker and I were alone in his hut, which was partly canvas and partly logs, with a spacious fireplace and chimney, he stood in his favorite attitude with his back to the fire, and, looking quizzically at me, said, "The President tells me that you know all about the letter he wrote to me when he put me in command of this army.
Page 271 - ... saying that she liked Moll Wemple and wanted her, and that she did not like Dame Tappan and did not want her. Upon this I came home, seeing clearly that my company was not desired longer. "I send you the stockings which I knitted for Mr. Stewart, and sundry other woollen trifles. Your sisters are all well, but the troubles in the Valley take young men's thoughts unduly off the subject of marriage. If the Committee would only hang John Johnson or themselves there would be peace, one way or the...
Page 65 - ... had said to him. The Johnsons were a great family now, receiving visits from notable people all over the colony at their new hall, which Sir William had built on the hills back of his new Scotch settlement. Nothing could have better shown how powerful Sir William had become, and how much his favor was to be courted, than the fact that ladies of quality and strict propriety, who fancied themselves very fine folk indeed, the De Lanceys and Phillipses and the like, would come visiting the widower...
Page 65 - ... propriety, who fancied themselves very fine folk indeed, the De Lanceys and Phillipses, and the like, would come visiting the widower baronet in his hall, and close their eyes to the presence there of Miss Molly and her half-breed children. Sir William's neighbors indeed overlooked this from their love for the man, and their reliance in his sense and strength. But the others, the aristocrats, held their tongues from fear of his wrath, and of his influence in London. They never liked him entirely...
Page 44 - Her little white rows of teeth were as regular and pearly as the upper kernels on an ear of fresh sweet corn. She had a ribbon in her long, glossy hair, and her face shone pleasantly with soap. My aunt had made her some shoes out of deer-hide, which Mr. Stewart chuckled over. " What a people the Dutch are ! " he said, with a smile. " The child is polished like the barrel of a gun. What's your name, little one?" The girl made no answer, from timidity I suppose. " Has she no name ? I should think she...
Page 149 - ... were, a land-slide and the chasm was now manifest to us all. Something of this was true all over the Colonies: no doubt what I noticed was but a phase of the general movement, part social, part religious, part political, now carrying us along with a perceptible glide toward the crisis of Revolution ; but here in the Valley, more than elsewhere, this broadening fissure of division ran through farms, through houses, ay, even through the group gathered in front of the family fireplace separating...
Page 83 - Young Butler burst into the conversation with eager bitterness : " Thoughtless ! Bash ! No the dogs know better ! There'll be no word that can be laid hold upon all circumspect outside, with hell itself underneath. Do we not know the canters? Oh ! but I'd smash through letter and seal of the law alike to get at them, were I in power. There'll be no peace till some strong hand does do it ! " Walter's deep eyes flashed and glowed as he spoke, and his face was shadowed with grave intensity of...
Page 189 - ... the De Lanceys, Phillipses, Wattses, and other Tory gentry whom I had seen. If they did not drink as deep, they read a good deal more, and were masters of as courteous and distinguished a manner. Heretofore I had suffered not a little from the notion enforced upon me by all my surroundings that gentility and good-breeding went hand in hand with loyalty to everything England did, and that disaffection was but another name for vulgarity and ignorance.

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