Sociology: Your Compass for a New World

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Cengage Learning, Jan 6, 2006 - Science - 732 pages
2 Reviews
This balanced, mainstream, beautifully written and totally up-to-date text is unrivalled in its ability to get students to see the connection between themselves and the social world. It teaches students how to think sociologically, not just what to think, and emphasizes the importance of diversity and a global perspective. It has been heralded for its inclusion of pop culture examples that instantly connect with today's students, and for its presentation of sociological concepts in a fresh, contemporary light.
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Review: Sociology: Your Compass for a New World

User Review  - Tom Oman - Goodreads

A really well written introduction to Sociology. I would recommend it just for the fact that, because it's a general survey of Sociology, it moves along quickly and only briefly touches on a wide ... Read full review

Review: Sociology: Your Compass for a New World

User Review  - Aresio Mavraganis - Goodreads

Useful for basics. Read full review

Contents

Chapter
1
Minority Report 2002
8
Chapter
16
The Problem of Fashion
20
What Do You Think? Are Corporate Scandals a Problem
28
Culture
62
Socialization
94
Monster 2003
100
Homosexuality
326
Toward 2050
336
Disability Aging and Death
346
3 Old Europe 331 Figure 20 9 Percent Change in Population of HighPoverty Neighborhoods United States
362
Work and the Economy
370
Politics
402
Theories of Democracy
408
Felon Disenfranchisement
417

Socialization Across the Life Course
113
Changing Patterns of Adolescent Socialization
119
Social Interaction
124
What Is Social Interaction?
125
Modes of Social Interaction
134
What Do You Think? Allocating Time Fairly in Class
145
From Groups to Societies
150
Beyond Individual Motives
151
Networks and Health
160
Bureaucracy
166
Societies
173
Deviance and Crime
182
The Social Definition of Deviance and Crime
183
Explaining Deviance and Crime
193
Trends in Criminal Justice
201
United States and Global Perspectives
212
Sweet Home Alabama 2002
220
Theories of Stratification
227
Noneconomic Dimensions of Class
237
What Do You Think? Redesigning Welfare
243
Globalization Inequality and Development
248
The Creation of a Global Village
249
What Do You Think? Should the United States Promote
257
Theories of Development and Underdevelopment
263
Three Kings 1999
272
Race and Ethnicity
276
Race and Ethnic Relations
284
What Do You Think? Bilingual Education
288
3 Ethnic Groups in the Soviet Union by December 31 2004 adult prevalence in parentheses 558
290
Some Advantages of Ethnicity
298
9 Percent of Population Accounted for by Figure 20 4 2000 Population Distribution in the United States 590
305
Hotel Rwanda 2004
308
Sexuality and Gender
312
Theories of Gender
315
Politics by Other Means
427
9 The Risk of War 2002
430
Families
434
Conflict and Feminist Theories
442
My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2002
448
Family Diversity
457
8 States with Laws Banning SameSex
459
What Do You Think? The ProFatherhood Campaign
463
Religion
468
The Rise Decline and Partial Revival of Religion
475
What Do You Think? Religious Profiling
482
The Future of Religion
494
Education
498
Class Privilege vs Affirmative Action
501
Microsociological Processes
511
Crisis and Reform in U S Schools
517
The Mass Media
528
2
531
Theories of Media Effects
535
Health and Medicine
552
What Kind of HealthCare System Do
565
Population and Urbanization
578
Population and Social Inequality
586
8 Mile 2002
598
Collective Action and Social Movements
604
How to Spark a Riot
605
Social Movements
613
The Contribution of Symbolic Interactionism
621
Technology and the Global Environment
632
The Social Construction of Environmental Problems
647
Evolution and Sociology
656
406
722
THE SOCIAL WORLD
724
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Robert J. Brym is Professor and Associate Chair (Undergraduate) of the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He has published widely on politics and social movements in Canada, Russia, and the Middle East. His most recent books are New Society, 7th edition (2014) and Society in Question, 7th edition (2014), both published by Nelson. He has served as editor of several scholarly journals and won numerous awards for his teaching and scholarly work. Brym recently completed a project on state and collective violence in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the results of which were published in Social Forces, the British Journal of Sociology, and elsewhere. He is currently conducting research on the democracy movement in the Middle East and North Africa.

John Lie was born in South Korea, grew up in Japan and Hawaii, and attended Harvard University. Currently Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, he has taught at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Harvard University, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the United States, as well as at universities in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and New Zealand. His main research interests are comparative macrosociology and comparative race and ethnic relations. He has taught introductory sociology classes ranging in size from three to over seven hundred students in several countries, and hopes that this book will stimulate readers' sociological imagination.

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