Life of Geoffrey Chaucer: The Early English Poet: Including Memoirs of His Near Friend and Kinsman, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster: with Sketches of the Manners, Opinions, Arts and Literature of England in the Fourteenth Century, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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T. Davison, 1804 - England - 516 pages
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Page 175 - Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid; Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut Made by the joiner squirrel, or old grub, Time out o' mind the fairies' coachmakers. And in this state she gallops night by night Through lovers...
Page 498 - What things have we seen Done at the ' Mermaid ? ' Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life. Then, when there hath been thrown Wit able enough to justify the town For three days past wit that might warrant be For the whole city to talk foolishly Till that were cancelled ; and when that was gone, We left an air behind us, which...
Page 175 - Tickling a parson's nose as a' lies asleep, Then dreams he of another benefice : Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep ; and then anon Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes, And being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again.
Page 274 - Let no man deceive you by any means ; for that day shall not come, except there come a falling away first, and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition ; who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshipped ; so that he as God sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself that he is God.
Page 97 - ... we shall probably be of opinion, that his majesty was either totally insensible of our author's poetical talents, or at least had no mind to encourage him in the cultivation or exercise of them.
Page 75 - tis in him to right Boccace. I prefer, in our countryman, far above all his other stories, the noble poem of Palamon and Arcite, which is of the epic kind, and perhaps not much inferior to the Ilias, or the jEneis. The story is more pleasing than either of them, the manners as perfect, the diction as poetical, the learning as deep and various, and the disposition full as artful...
Page 245 - And than become the ground so proude, That it wol have a newe shroude, And maketh so queint his robe and faire, That it had hewes an hundred paire, Of grasse and floures, of Inde and Pers, And many hewes full divers : That is the robe I mean ywis, Through which the ground to praisen is.
Page 103 - And, sooth to seyn, my chambre was Ful wel depeynted, and with glas Were al the windowes wel y-glased, Ful clere, and nat an hole y-crased, That to beholde hit was gret joye.
Page 294 - Cependant leur scavoir ne s'estend seulement Qu'a regratter un mot douteux au jugement, Prendre garde qu'un qui ne heurte une diphtongue ; Espier si des vers la rime est breve ou longue ; Ou bien si la voyelle, a 1'autre s'unissant, Ne rend point a 1'oreille un vers trop languissant. Us rampent bassement, foibles d'inventions, Et n'osent peu hardis tenter les fictions, Froids a 1'imaginer ; car s'ils font quelque chose C'est proser de la rime, et rimer de la prose, Que 1'art lime et relime, et polit...
Page 226 - Duke of Lancaster. The style of John of Gaunt was now Duke of Lancaster, and Earl of Richmond, Leicester, Lincoln, and Derby : and he claimed, as Earl of Leicester, the office of hereditary seneschal, or Steward of England ; as Duke of Lancaster, to bear the great sword called Curtana, before the kings of England at their coronation ; and as Earl of Lincoln, to be grand carver at the dinner given on that occasion.

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