A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy

Front Cover
ReadHowYouWant.com, Jan 1, 2006 - Fiction - 260 pages
0 Reviews
"I have laid a plan for something new, quite out of the beaten track." The result, A Sentimental Journey is as far from the conventional travel book as Tristram Shandy is from other novels. This volume includes the journal Sterne wrote for Eliza Draper which is essential reading for anyone
interested in the development of his comic and satiric genius.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Calais
1
Calais The Monk
3
Calais The Monk
7
Calais The Monk
9
Calais The Désobligeant
10
Preface In the Désobligeant
11
Calais
19
Calais In the Street
22
Paris The Rose
119
Paris The Fille de Chambre
123
Paris The Passport
130
The Hotel at Paris The Passport
134
Paris The Captive
140
Road to Versailles The Starling
143
Versailles The Address
146
Versailles Le Pâtissier
150

Calais The Remise Door
25
Calais The Remise Door
28
Calais The Snuffbox
32
Calais The Remise Door
36
Calais In the Street
39
Calais The Remise
42
Calais The Remise
44
Calais The Remise
47
Calais In the Street
49
Montriul
53
Montriul
59
Montriul
61
A Fragment
63
Montriul
65
The Bidet
69
Nampont The Dead Ass
73
Nampont The Postillion
77
Amiens
80
Amiens The Letter
84
The Letter
90
Paris
92
Paris The Wig
94
Paris The Pulse
97
Paris The Husband
102
Paris The Gloves
105
Paris The Translation
108
Paris The Dwarf
113
Rennes The Sword
155
Versailles The Passport
159
Versailles The Passport
165
Versailles The Passport
168
Versailles The Passport
171
Versailles Character
173
Paris The Temptation
177
The Conquest
182
Paris The Mystery
184
The Case of Conscience
187
Paris The Riddle
191
Paris Le Dimanche
194
Paris The Fragment
198
Paris The Fragment
200
Paris The Fragment the Bouquet
207
Paris The Act of Charity
209
Paris The Riddle Explained
214
Paris
216
Moulines Maria
222
Maria
226
Moulines Maria
229
The Bourbonnois
230
The Supper
232
The Grace
235
The Case of Delicacy
237
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2006)

If Fielding showed that the novel (like the traditional epic or drama) could make the chaos of life coherent in art, Sterne only a few years later in The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760--67) laughed away the notion of order. In Sterne's world, people are sealed off in their own minds so that only in unpredictable moments of spontaneous feeling are they aware of another human being. Reviewers attacked the obscenity of Tristram's imagined autobiography as it was published (two volumes each in 1759, early 1761, late 1761, 1765, and one in 1767), particularly when the author revealed himself as a clergyman, but the presses teemed with imitations of this great literary hit of the 1760s. Through the mind of the eccentric hero, Sterne subverted accepted ideas on conception, birth, childhood, education, and the contemplation of maturity and death, so that Tristram's concerns touched his contemporaries and are still important. Since Tristram Shandy is patently a great and lasting comic work that yet seems, as E. M. Forster said, "ruled by the Great God Muddle," much recent criticism has centered on the question of its unity or lack of it; and its manipulation of time and of mental processes has been considered particularly relevant to the problems of fiction in our day. Sterne's Sentimental Journey (1768) has been immensely admired by some critics for its superb tonal balance of irony and sentiment. His Sermons of Mr. Yorick (1760) catches the spirit of its time by dramatically preaching benevolence and sympathy as superior to doctrine. Whether as Tristram or as Yorick, Sterne is probably the most memorably personal voice in eighteenth-century fiction.

Bibliographic information