Sword at Sunset (Google eBook)

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Chicago Review Press, May 1, 2008 - Fiction - 512 pages
48 Reviews

This brilliant Arthurian epic cuts through the mists of pagan, early Christian, and medieval splendors that have gathered about the subject and tells the authentic story of the man who may well have been the real King Arthur—Artos the Bear, the mighty warrior-king who saved the last lights of Western civilization when the barbarian darkness descended in the fifth century. Presenting early Britain as it was after the departure of the Romans—no Round Table, no many-towered Camelot—the setting is a hard, savage land, half-civilized, half-pagan, where a few men struggled to forge a nation and hold back the Saxon scourge. Richly detailed, the story chronicles the formation of a great army, the hardships of winter quarters, the primitive wedding feasts, the pagan fertility rites, the agonies of surgery after battle, the thrilling stag hunts, and the glorious processions of the era. Stripped of the chivalric embellishments that the French applied to British history centuries ago, the Arthurian age here emerges as a time when men stood at the precipice of history—a time of transition and changing values and imminent national peril.

  

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The characters and plot are well drawn and captivating. - Goodreads
They all deal with morals and character development. - Goodreads
Ms. Suttcliffe has a beautiful style of writing. - Goodreads

Review: Sword at Sunset (The Dolphin Ring Cycle #5)

User Review  - Michele - Goodreads

I've read so many Arthurian retellings, that it's hard to read a new one and not compare it to the others. Sword at Sunset is gritty and stays away from the mysticism of many other tellings. Instead ... Read full review

Review: Sword at Sunset (The Dolphin Ring Cycle #5)

User Review  - Jeremiah - Goodreads

I really liked this Book. Am a huge fan of historical fiction and this is one of the finest books of that genre I have ever read. Ms. Suttcliffe has a beautiful style of writing. You feel as if you have lived the story. Read full review

Contents

Title Page
CHAPTER THREE The Birds of Rhiannon
CHAPTER FIVE Bedwyr
CHAPTER SEVEN Frontiers
CHAPTER EIGHT Wind from the North CHAPTER NINE War Horns in the Spring
CHAPTERFIFTEEN Midsummer Fires CHAPTER SIXTEEN Lammas Torches
CHAPTERTWENTYFOUR The Fetch CHAPTER TWENTYFIVE Shadows CHAPTER TWENTYSIX The Sword intheSky CHAPTER TWENTYSE...
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About the author (2008)

Rosemary Sutcliff, December 14, 1920 - July 23, 1992 Rosemary Sutcliff was on December 14, 1920 in East Clandon in Surrey. Her father was in the Navy and her mother was a homemaker. As a child she had Stills Disease, a form of juvenile arthritis. The effect of this led to many stays in hospital for painful remedial operations. Due to her fathers postings she moved frequently, living in Malta, Streatham, London, Chatham Dockyard, Sheerness Dockyard and North Devon. Sutcliff did not learn to read until the age of nine. Sutcliff ended her formal education at fourteen, and went to Bideford Art School. She passed the City and Guilds examination, and was advised to make the painting of miniatures her profession. Around the middle of the War, Sutcliff got an urge to write. She felt cramped by the small canvas of miniature painting, and so turned to writing. The first story she could remember writing was "Wild Sunrise," a story about a British chieftain faced with the invasion of the Romans. Not long after the end of the War, Sutcliff wrote a re-telling of Celtic and Saxon legends which she showed to an old friend. He sent them to Oxford University Press (OUP). Although they rejected the manuscript, they requested that she write a version of the Robin Hood Story. Sutcliff finished "The Chronicles of Robin Hood" and sent it to the publishing company. It took eighteen months for the manuscript to be returned to her, during which time she wrote "The Queen Elizabeth Story" and sent it on to OUP as well. It was accepted, and the two books were eventually published in the same year, 1950. Sutcliff wrote her autobiography "Blue Remembered Hills" and often thought of writing another volume of it as she grew older. Her mother died during the 1960s, and Sutcliff and her father moved to Sussex. Despite being increasingly disabled, she travelled abroad and visited Greece. Her father died in the early 1980s. Sutcliff was writing the morning that she died on July 23, 1992. She had completed the second draft of a novel published in 1997 as "Sword Song," with two more works waiting to be published.

Writer Jack Whyte was born in Scotland in 1940. He was raised in Scotland, but educated in England and France before migrating to Canada in 1967. He spent one year teaching English in high school, before focusing on a career as a professional singer, musician, and actor. He wrote, directed and appeared in a one man show about Scotland's national poet Robert Burns in the early 1970's. Due to the show's success, he started writing for CBC national television and eventually went into advertising. He is the author of The Camulod Chronicles or A Dream of Eagles series which sets the tales of King Arthur in Roman Britain and Templar Trilogy which deals with the rise and fall of the Order of the Knights of the Temple of Solomon.

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