Novels of George Eliot: Daniel Deronda (Google eBook)

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Harper, 1876 - English literature
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Page 272 - My apprehensions come in crowds ; I dread the rustling of the grass ; The very shadows of the clouds Have power to shake me as they pass ; I question things, and do not find One that will answer to my mind ; And all the world appears unkind.
Page 194 - ... distance ; and for a long while he never turned his eyes from the view right in front of him. He was forgetting everything else in a half-speculative, halfinvoluntary identification of himself with the objects he was looking at, thinking how far it might be possible habitually to shift his centre till his own personality would be no less outside him than the landscape...
Page 127 - What in the midst of that mighty drama are girls and their blind visions ? They are the Yea or Nay of that good for which men are enduring and fighting. In these delicate vessels is borne onward through the ages the treasure of human affections.
Page 375 - ... of lost souls, that dead anatomy of culture which turns the universe into a mere ceaseless answer to queries, and knows, not everything, but everything else about everything —as if one should be ignorant of nothing concerning the scent of violets except the scent itself for which one had no nostril...
Page 27 - Gwendolen first, went to look. The opened panel had disclosed the picture of an upturned dead face, from which an obscure figure seemed to be fleeing with outstretched arms.
Page 368 - I am the grave in which your chance of happiness is buried as well as mine. You had your warning. You have chosen to injure me and my children. He had meant to marry me. He would have married me at last, if you had not broken your word. You will have your punishment. I desire it with all my soul.
Page 286 - ... where she had first placed it when it had been returned to her, was more peculiar, and what would be called less reasonable. It came from that streak of superstition in her which attached itself both to her confidence and her terror - a superstition which lingers in an intense personality even in spite of theory and science; any dread or hope for self being stronger than all reasons for or against it. Why she should suddenly determine not to part with the necklace was not much clearer to her...
Page 50 - ... which expresses a puerile state of culture — a dandling, canting, seesaw kind of stuff — the passion and thought of people without any breadth of horizon. There is a sort of self-satisfied folly about every phrase of such melody ; no cries of deep, mysterious passion — no conflict — no sens& of the universal. It makes men small as they listen to it. Sing now something larger. And I shall see.
Page 7 - Probably the evil ; else why was the effect that of unrest rather than of undisturbed charm? Why was the wish to look again felt as coercion and not as a longing in which the whole being consents?
Page 127 - Could there be a slenderer, more insignificant thread in human history than this consciousness of a girl, busy with her small inferences of the way in which she could make her life pleasant ? — in a time, too, when ideas were with fresh vigour making armies of themselves, and the universal kinship was declaring itself fiercely : when women on the other side of the world would not mourn for the husbands and sons who died bravely in a common cause, and men stinted of bread on...

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