Public School Methods, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Methods Company, 1916 - Teaching
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Character the Aim of Education
283
Mechanism of Character Development
285
Feelings and Emotions
287
Emotional Runaways
288
Imagination and Phantasy
290
Association of Ideas
291
Judgment and Reason
292
Moral Responsibility
293
The Power of Decision
294
The Supreme Court of the Mind
295
Habit The Connection between Mind and Body
297
Character and Conscience
298
Difference between Temperament and Character
300
Heredity and Environment
301
The Influence of Nursery Conduct on Character
303
Implicit Obedience Respect for Authority
304
The Psychology of Child Culture
306
The Childs ViewPoint
307
Faith Versus Fear
308
The Power of Positive Suggestions
310
How and When to Suggest
313
The Biology and Psychology of Play
315
The Influence of Organized Play on Character
320
The Call of the Wild
321
SelfReliance in Early Childhood
322
Early Development of Responsibility
324
New Problems Resulting from Social Evolution
326
Subduing Nature Raw Materials
328
The Use of Tools Industrial Training
330
The Province of Books
331
Early Financial Training
332
The Personality of the Teacher
333
Moral Growth through Practice
334
Pupil Government and Character Development
335
Threats Punishments and Rewards
337
Order Neatness and Punctuality
338
Kindness Courtesy and Tolerance
339
Gratitude Reverence and Respectfulness
340
Confidence Courage and Perseverance
341
Health Cleanliness and Cheerfulness
342
Honor Fair Play and Patriotism
343
Work Thrift and Business
344
The Nervous Child
346
Teaching Truth
350
Test Questions
351
CHAPTER THIRTEEN Music 1 The Aim of Music in Public Schools
353
Material
354
h Suggestions
355
Order of Development
366
General Suggestions
372
Cradle Song
378
LadyBird
384
Christmas Song 39
390
Christmas Program 400405
400
Let Us Be Like Him 4
407
Tributes to Lincoln
413
Longfellow Day Program 422437
422
Flag Day Program 438445
438
Arbor and Bird Day Program 446460
446
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 428 - THE shades of night were falling fast, As through an Alpine village passed A youth, who bore, 'mid snow and ice, A banner with the strange device, Excelsior! His brow was sad; his eye beneath, Flashed like a falchion from its sheath, And like a silver clarion rung The accents of that unknown tongue, Excelsior...
Page 423 - It sounds to him like her mother's voice, Singing in Paradise! He needs must think of her once more, How in the grave she lies; And with his hard, rough hand he wipes A tear out of his eyes. Toiling— rejoicing— sorrowing, Onward through life he goes; Each morning sees some task begun, Each evening sees it close; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose.
Page 422 - Between the dark and the daylight, When the night is beginning to lower, Comes a pause in the day's occupations, That is known as the Children's Hour. I hear in the chamber above me The patter of little feet, The sound of a door that is opened, And voices soft and sweet. From my study I see in the lamplight, Descending the broad hall stair, Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra, And Edith with golden hair.
Page 426 - Her rattling shrouds, all sheathed in ice, With the masts went by the board; Like a vessel of glass, she stove and sank, Ho! ho! the breakers roared! At daybreak, on the bleak sea-beach, A fisherman stood aghast, To see the form of a maiden fair, Lashed close to a drifting mast. The salt sea was frozen on her breast, The salt tears in her eyes; And he saw her hair, like the brown sea-weed, On the billows fall and rise. Such was the wreck of the Hesperus, In the midnight and the snow! Christ save...
Page 431 - Tis the heaven of flowers you see there; All the wild-flowers of the forest, All the lilies of the prairie, When on earth they fade and perish, Blossom in that heaven above us.
Page 422 - The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands.
Page 447 - You call them thieves and pillagers ; but know, They are the winged wardens of your farms, Who from the cornfields drive the insidious foe, And from your harvests keep a hundred harms; Even the blackest of them all, the crow, Renders good service as your man-at-arms, Crushing the beetle in his coat of mail, And crying havoc on the slug and snail.
Page 480 - The wonderful air is over me, And the wonderful wind is shaking the tree : It walks on the water, and whirls the mills, And talks to itself on the top of the hills.
Page 65 - I was dirty from my journey; my pockets were stuff d out with shirts and stockings, and I knew no soul nor where to look for lodging. I was fatigued with traveling, rowing, and want of rest, I was very hungry; and my whole stock of cash consisted of a Dutch dollar, and about a shilling in copper.
Page 420 - Tell me not, in mournful numbers, Life is but an empty dream ! — For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem. Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal ; Dust thou art, to dust returnest, Was not spoken of the soul.

Bibliographic information