Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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W. Tegg, 1854 - Ireland
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Page 121 - It has been said that no man is a hero to his valet; and all the world saw as much of Louis the Fourteenth as his valet could see.
Page 194 - To St. Columbkill I offer up this button, a bit o' the waistband o' my own breeches, an' a taste o' my wife's petticoat, in remimbrance of us havin' made this holy station ; an...
Page 354 - The words were scarcely uttered, when those who had stood beside the altar during the night sprang from their places, and descending its steps rapidly, turned round, and raising their arms, exclaimed, " By all that's sacred an
Page 424 - O'Connor ; an' if you can help me to the wife, I promise to take in your coat the next time for nothin'." " Well, then," said Mr. O'Connor, " what would you think of the butcher's daughter, Biddy Neil ? You have always had a thirst for blood, and here you may have it gratified in an innocent manner should you ever become sanguinary again.
Page 75 - Mrs. Sullivan was the wife of a wealthy farmer, and niece to the Rev. Felix O'Rourke; her kitchen was consequently large comfortable, and warm. Over where she sat jutted out the "brace" well lined with bacon; to the right hung a well-scoured salt-box, and to the left was the jamb, with its little Gothic paneless window to admit the light. Within it hung several ash rungs, seasoning for flail-sooples, or boulteens, a dozen of eel-skins and several stripes of horse-skin, as hangings for them. The dresser...
Page 423 - I began to get fond o' them, an' to think of marriage." The schoolmaster shook his head again, and looked rather miserable. Neal rubbed his hands with glee, and looked perfectly happy. The schoolmaster shook his head again, and looked more miserable than before. Neal's happiness also increased on the second rubbing. Now, to tell the secret at once, Mr. O'Connor would not have appeared so miserable, were it not for Neal's happiness ; nor Neal so happy, were it not for Mr. O'Connor's misery. It was...
Page 424 - Neal, the monks of old were happy men; they were all fat and had double chins; and, Neal, I tell you that all fat men are in general happy. Care cannot come at them so readily as at a thin man; before it gets through the strong outworks of flesh and blood with which they are surrounded, it becomes treacherous to its original purpose, joins the cheerful spirits it meets in the system, and dances about the heart in all the madness of mirth; just like a sincere ecclesiastic who comes to lecture a good...
Page 417 - The world for once became astonishingly Christian ; it paid back all his efforts to excite its resentment with the purest of charity ; when Neal struck it on the one cheek, it meekly turned unto him the other. It could scarcely be expected that Neal would bear this. To have the. whole world in friendship with a man is beyond doubt rather an affliction. Not to have the face of a single enemy to look upon, would decidedly be considered a deprivation of many agreeable sensations by most people, as well...
Page 420 - I have not been guilty of a contradiction, out of my own school, for the last fourteen years. I once expressed the shadow of a doubt about twelve years ago, but ever since I have abandoned even doubting. That doubt was the last expiring effort at maintaining my domestic authority but I suffered for it.
Page 416 - His father, his grandfather, and his great grandfather, were all fighting men, and his ancestors in general, up, probably, to Con of the Hundred Battles himself. No wonder, therefore, that Neal's blood should cry out against the cowardice of his calling ; no wonder that he should be an epitome of all that was valorous and heroic in a peaceable man, for we neglected to inform the reader that Neal, though " bearing no base mind," never fought any man in his own person.

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