Pedagogy of the Oppressed

Front Cover
Continuum, 1993 - Education - 164 pages
5 Reviews
On the 20th anniversary of its publication, this classic manifesto is updated with an important new preface by the author. Freire reflects on the impact his book has had, and on many of the issues it raises for readers in the 1990s. These include the fundamental question of liberation and inclusive language as it relates to Freire's own insights and approaches.

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Review: Pedagogy of the Oppressed

User Review  - Jeremy - Goodreads

Wow... where to begin. This is a revolutionary text, and it has inspired me to become and educator. In all honesty I really dislike this translation, as it truly hinders the flow of the text. And my ... Read full review

Review: Pedagogy of the Oppressed

User Review  - Chris - Goodreads

I don't get this book. I found it to be an overacademic hard to read book about making education less academic and more accessible. Read full review

Contents

Publishers Foreword
9
Chapter 1
25
Chapter 2
52
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Paulo Freire is one of the most widely read educational philosophers and practitioners in the world today, except in the United States, where he remains relatively unknown to many in the educational community as well as the general public. Freire received international acclaim and notoriety with his first and best-known work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, first published in English in 1970. His teachings draw much of their inspiration from a Marxist critique of society; for this reason he was forced into exile from his native Brazil in 1964, and his works were banned in many developing nations. His pedagogy for adult literacy has been implemented successfully in several African nations and has been the basis for literacy crusades in Nicaragua and other Latin American countries. His philosophical approach to education forms the basis for much of the critical theory work in education now taking place in the United States, Europe, and developing nations.

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