Kenilworth: A Romance

Front Cover
Penguin, Jan 1, 1999 - Fiction - 467 pages
14 Reviews
In the court of Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, is favoured above all the noblemen of England. It is rumoured that the Queen may chose him for her husband, but Leicester has secretly married the beautiful Amy Robsart. Fearing ruin if this were known, he keeps his lovely young wife a virtual prisoner in an old country house. Meanwhile Leicester's manservant Varney has sinister designs on Amy, and enlists an alchemist to help him further his evil ambitions. Brilliantly recreating the splendour and pageantry of Elizabethan England, with Shakespeare, Walter Ralegh and Elizabeth herself among its characters, Kenilworth (1821) is a compelling depiction of intrigue, power struggles and superstition in a bygone age.
  

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Review: Kenilworth

User Review  - Denisa - Goodreads

Another rating: 8/10 Slow-pacing with truly sad ending. Characters were well-written. I am not a fan of romantic book but I enjoyed this. Read full review

Review: Kenilworth

User Review  - Hepster - Goodreads

This book was a long haul. The plot is all about court intrigues in Elizabethan England, but Scott beats around the bush a lot, possibly to add more Elizabethan detail to the story. For example, Queen ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Acknowledgements
viii
The Waverley Novels in Penguin
x
Introduction
xiii
Chronology of Walter Scott
xxxii
Further Reading
xli
A Note on the Text
xliv
A ROMANCE
xlvii
Volume I
1
Volume II
125
Volume III
259
William Julius Mickle Cumnor Hall 1784
393
Historical Note
397
Explanatory Notes
407
Glossary
453
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action. The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810) made his reputation as one of the leading poets of his time. A novel, Waverley, which he had begun in 1805, was published anonymously in 1814. Subsequent novels appeared with the note “by the author of Waverley”; hence his novels often are called collectively “the Waverley novels.” Some of the most famous of these are Old Mortality (1816), Rob Roy (1817), Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), and Quentin Durward (1823). In recognition of his literary work Scott was made a baronet in 1819. During his last years he held various official positions and published biographies, editions of Swift and Dryden, tales, lyric poetry, and various studies of history and antiquity. He died in 1832.

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