Hartness flat turret lathe manual: a hand book for operators (Google eBook)

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Jones & Lamson machine company, 1915 - Lathes - 184 pages
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Page 78 - LATHES under the working tool, and so close to it that there can be no lost motion between the tool and the locking pin. The turret is turned automatically to each position the instant the tool clears the work on its backward travel, and it is so arranged that by raising and lowering trip screws near the center of the turret it may be turned to three, four, or five of the six places without making any other stops.
Page 78 - ... bearing, insuring accurate results. The turret is a flat circular plate and is mounted on a low carriage containing controlling mechanism. The connections of the turret to the carriage, and the carriage to the lathe bed, are the most direct and rigid, affording absolute control of the cutting-tools. The turret is accurately surfaced to its seat on the carriage by scraping, and securely held down on that seat by an annular gib. In the same manner the carriage is fitted to the V's of the bed; the...
Page 71 - HARTNESS FLAT TURRET LATHES: The Hartness Flat Turret Lathe with cross-sliding head is made in two sizes, and may be furnished with an equipment of tools for either bar work or chuck work, or a double equipment for both bar and chuck work. The smaller machine is called the 2 1£ x 24-in.
Page 72 - It may also be equipped for chuck work up to inches in diameter. SPECIAL FEATURES: The Original Flat Turret: The Flat Turret was put on the market in 1891. Over fourteen thousand (14,000) machines equipped with them have been built and sold since, to the great satisfaction of the users. A large, steady...
Page 135 - ... know how to make the machine do its best work than the cutting angles of the tools. In a general way every one knows that a tool should have the least amount of clearance and the greatest amount of rake consistent with the wear of the tool, but the man that makes the greatest record is the one that puts it into practice. The next point is that no tool should be allowed to project beyond its holder or support more than is absolutely necessary. After having ground and set the tool properly, see...
Page 137 - ... this is to turn the tool upside down to get the pressure down on the work. Chattering is destructive to the sharp edge of the tool and should be stopped as soon as noticed ; but do not think a lighter cut is necessary, for frequently a heavier cut stops the chattering. Facing cuts should be taken by tools with round shanks, for these can be turned so as to give the desired rake for free cutting. In facing a piece in which the diameter of the cut in one place is two or three times its smallest...
Page 137 - More feed is usually the cure for chattering. Of course, chattering may be caused by a cut that is just heavy enough to balance the weight of the work and spindle, and then the slight necessary looseness of spindle bearings gives the chance for chattering. An old-fashioned remedy for this is to turn the tool upside down to get the pressure down on the work. Chattering is destructive to the sharp edge of the tool and should be stopped as soon as noticed ; but do not think a lighter cut is necessary,...
Page 135 - For instance, if a tool is to be used for facing a hub of a gear, the part that begins to cut first should be a sharp angle, so that the heaviest part of the chip should flow easily away, while that part of the tool that leaves its mark on the finished face should take a shearing cut or angular shaping cut, which leaves the smooth surface. Perhaps there is no more important point to be borne in mind by any one wishing to know how to make the machine do its best work than the cutting angles of the...
Page 136 - ... the tool not only remove the metal, but cut it into fine chips having no special value. Even weak lathes generally do better work with a medium feed than a fine feed. It is not uncommon to see a very fine feed being used in trying to turn an extra true piece of work, with the only result that the tool does not leave an even surface. It alternately rides and " digs in " with a fine feed, when an even, steady cut would have been obtained by a medium feed.
Page 153 - BAR The Machine — One 2% x 24-inch Flat Turret Lathe, cross-feed head, single drive, four tool holders, three stock supports, oil pump and piping, friction countershaft, cast-iron table for holding tools, etc., and suitable wrenches. Parts for Handling tLa n~ -* o«— A — A.,*,™,.,*;,, M,.,~U ... j roller feed.

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