A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Sir William Smith, William Wayte, George Eden Marindin
J. Murray, 1901 - Classical dictionaries
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Page 109 - Hesperides, and was afterwards broken into the rocks and caverns of Thrace. The subterraneous pipes conveyed an inexhaustible supply of water, and what had just before appeared a level plain might be suddenly converted into a wide lake, covered with armed vessels, and replenished with the monsters of the deep.
Page 186 - ARISTOCRATIA. aries in its simplest state, and as it was borne and impelled by human hands, without other assistance. In an improved form, the ram was surrounded with iron bands, to which rings were attached for the purpose of suspending it by ropes or chains from a beam fixed transversely over it.
Page 109 - Thrace. The subterraneous pipes conveyed an inexhaustible supply of water, and what had just before appeared a level plain might be suddenly converted into a wide lake, covered with armed vessels, and replenished with the monsters of the deep. In the decoration of these scenes, the Roman emperors displayed their wealth and liberality ; and we read on various occasions that the whole furniture of the amphitheatre consisted either of silver, or of gold, or of amber.
Page 269 - Thermae (ftep^cu, hot springs) meant properly warm springs, or baths of warm water ; but came to be applied to those magnificent edifices which grew up under the empire, in place of the simple balneae of the republic, and which comprised within their range of buildings all the appurtenances belonging to the Greek gymnasia, as well as a regular establishment appropriated for bathing. (Juv.
Page 425 - The months confifted of 30 and 29 days alternately ; and the fliort year confequently contained 354 days, while the intercalary year having an extra month of 30 days, had 384 days. In Europe no era was fo generally ufed in literature, as the era of the Olympiads; and as the Olympic games were celebrated 293 times, we have 293 Olympic cycles, ie 1172 years, of which 776 fall before i AD, and 396 during the Chriftian era. When the Greeks adopted Chriftianity they probably ufed the Julian year and the...
Page 171 - It would seem that the arch, as thus defined, and as used by the Romans, was not known to the Greeks in the early periods of their history, otherwise a language so copious as theirs, and of such ready application, would not have wanted a name properly Greek by which to distinguish it.
Page 223 - ... through the different stages of his annual career. Accordingly we find, that as early as the time of Hesiod, the changes of the seasons, and the more important operations of agriculture, were fixed with reference to the risings and settings of Orion, the Pleiades, the Hyades, Arcturus, and Sirius. Such observations were in the first instance extremely rude; but after Thales had turned the attention of his countrymen to scientific astronomy, these celestial phenomena were determined with great...
Page 276 - In most cases the tepidarium contained no water at all, but was a room merely heated with warm air of an agreeable temperature, in order to prepare the body for the great heat of the vapour and warm baths, and upon returning from tte latter, to obviate the danger of a too sudden transition to the open air.
Page 296 - In the time of Cicero it was usual for a general, or a governor of a province, to report to the treasury the names of those under his command who had done good service to the state: those who were included in such report were said in beneftciis ad aerarium deferri.
Page 147 - The detailed description of the arrangements of the aqueduct will be better understood, after an enumeration of the principal aqueducts by which water was conveyed to Rome across the Campngua.

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