Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1984 - Fiction - 216 pages
15 Reviews
Intrepid archaeologist Indiana Jones escapes death in Shanghai only to find himself in a remote village in India, where he competes with evil adversaries to unlock the secret of the Temple of Doom

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Review: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom: The Illustrated Screenplay

User Review  - Trent - Goodreads

Indiana Jones Temple of doom is a great book about an archeologist named Indy. He goes to a temple to find the Sankara stones to help a small Indian village recover from an attack from a group of ... Read full review

Review: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Indiana Jones: Film Novelizations #2)

User Review  - Richard Evey jr. - Goodreads

Very good novalization. Fills in pieces missing from the movie without being overdone. Well written and adds nicely to the lore. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
21
Section 3
44
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1984)

Best-selling author, James Kahn, is a medical specialist, writer, and musician-and is considered a legend in the Sci-Fi adventure book, film and TV industries. His writing credits range from authoring Return of the Jedi (on the NY Times Best-seller List for numerous weeks), Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Goonies, and Poltergeist to being the writer-producer for such television shows as Melrose Place and Star Trek: The Next Generation. Icon movie director/producer Steven Spielberg and renowned sci-fi author Lester Del Rey are among his many friends, fans and collaborators over the years.

George Walton Lucas, Jr. (born May 14, 1944) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, and entrepreneur. He founded Lucasfilm and led the company as chairman and chief executive before selling it to The Walt Disney Company on October 30, 2012. As a graduate of the prestigious Cinema Studies program of the University of Southern California, George Lucas represents the movie-educated generation of American filmmakers, which emerged in the 1970's, including Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, and Brian DePalma. Lucas's award-winning 20-minute student science fiction film, "THX-1138," and a student fellowship to work with Coppola, launched a career of unprecedented financial success. Backed by Coppola, he made a feature-length version of "THX-1138" (1971), then gained wide recognition with the release of "American Graffiti" (1973), a look at high school in 1962 whose rock-and-roll soundtrack set off a wave of 1950's nostalgia. Made for $750,000, "American Graffiti" grossed nearly $50 million. However, Lucas's "Star Wars" (1977) broke all box-office records and defined the basic terms of Lucas's legacy: Spectacular technical effects and a comic-book sense of adventure. Lucas wrote the scenarios for the "Star Wars" sequels, "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) and "Return of the Jedi" (1983), and later for the "Indiana Jones" films, but he handed over directing to others. The American Film Institute awarded Lucas its Life Achievement Award on June 9, 2005. He has been nominated for four Academy Awards: Best Directing and Writing for American Graffiti, and Best Directing and Writing for Star Wars. He received the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Award in 1991. The Discovery Channel named him one of the 100 "Greatest Americans" in September 2008. In July 2013, Lucas was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Barack Obama for his contributions to American cinema.

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