Watergate in American Memory: How We Remember, Forget, and Reconstruct the Past

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Basic Books, 1993 - History - 282 pages
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A look at what Americans remember (and what they have forgotten) about one of the most traumatic domestic political event in the America's post-war history.
  

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Watergate in American memory: how we remember, forget, and reconstruct the past

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

On the 20th anniversary of the Democratic headquarters break-in, has the Watergate perpetual publishing machine cranked out another play-it-again-Sam Ervin reprise? No! This engrossing overview shows ... Read full review

Review: Watergate in American Memory: How We Remember, Forget, and Reconstruct the Past

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

At times quite dry, but in all, a very interesting and useful examination of the means by which collective memory is shaped and contested. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Constitutional Crisis
9
Routine or Aberration?
34
Collective Memory and Watergate
51
Making Careers Out
69
Reform and the Lessons of
88
Watergate and the Media
103
Conventionalizing Watergate
127
PostWatergate Political
148
The Metaphor of Watergate
165
Richard Nixons Campaign
185
PART III
203
Notes
223
Index
269
Copyright

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References to this book

Nixon Reconsidered
Joan Hoff
Limited preview - 1995
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About the author (1993)

Michael Schudson, a Professor of Journalism at Columbia, is the author of seven books and editor of three others on the history and sociology of the American news media, the history of U.S. citizenship and political participation, and related topics. His most recent book is "Why Democracies Need an Unlovable Press" (2008). He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur Foundation "genius" award.

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