String Theory and M-Theory: A Modern Introduction (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Dec 7, 2006 - Science
2 Reviews
String theory is one of the most exciting and challenging areas of modern theoretical physics. This book guides the reader from the basics of string theory to recent developments. It introduces the basics of perturbative string theory, world-sheet supersymmetry, space-time supersymmetry, conformal field theory and the heterotic string, before describing modern developments, including D-branes, string dualities and M-theory. It then covers string geometry and flux compactifications, applications to cosmology and particle physics, black holes in string theory and M-theory, and the microscopic origin of black-hole entropy. It concludes with Matrix theory, the AdS/CFT duality and its generalizations. This book is ideal for graduate students and researchers in modern string theory, and will make an excellent textbook for a one-year course on string theory. It contains over 120 exercises with solutions, and over 200 homework problems with solutions available on a password protected website for lecturers at www.cambridge.org/9780521860697.
  

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Contents

II
1
III
2
IV
3
V
6
VI
9
VII
17
IX
24
X
30
XLVI
323
XLVII
329
XLVIII
338
XLIX
354
L
358
LI
363
LII
366
LIII
374

XI
36
XII
48
XIII
58
XIV
75
XV
81
XVI
85
XVII
89
XVIII
98
XIX
100
XX
109
XXI
110
XXII
112
XXIII
118
XXIV
122
XXV
124
XXVI
130
XXVII
140
XXVIII
148
XXIX
149
XXX
155
XXXI
160
XXXII
169
XXXIII
187
XXXIV
188
XXXV
203
XXXVI
220
XXXVII
227
XXXVIII
229
XXXIX
249
XL
250
XLI
252
XLII
265
XLIII
286
XLIV
296
XLV
300
LIV
385
LV
391
LVI
399
LVII
403
LVIII
411
LIX
415
LX
418
LXI
433
LXII
456
LXIII
460
LXIV
480
LXV
499
LXVI
508
LXVII
518
LXVIII
522
LXIX
526
LXX
549
LXXI
552
LXXII
562
LXXIII
566
LXXIV
582
LXXV
587
LXXVI
599
LXXVII
610
LXXVIII
613
LXXIX
625
LXXX
638
LXXXI
669
LXXXII
677
LXXXIII
684
LXXXIV
690
LXXXV
700
LXXXVI
726
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - The only way this makes sense is if the open string ends on a physical object - it ends on a D-brane. (D stands for Dirichlet.) If all the open-string boundary conditions are Neumann, then the ends of the string can be anywhere in the spacetime. The modern interpretation is that this means that there are spacetimefilling D-branes present. Let us now consider the closed-string case in more detail. The general solution of the 2d wave equation is given by a sum of "right-movers" and "left-movers": xtt(ff,T)=3^(Ta)...
Page 712 - D = 10 Supergravity And The Unitary Supermultiplets Of U(2, 2/4),
Page 700 - Mukhi, S. (1981). The background field method and the ultraviolet structure of the supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model. Annals of Physics, 134, 85.
Page 7 - Quantum mechanically, the story is more subtle. Instead of eliminating h via its classical field equations, one should perform a Feynman path integral, using standard machinery to deal with the local symmetries and gauge fixing. When this is done correctly, one finds that in general <p does not decouple from the answer.
Page 704 - A SIMPLE PHYSICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE CRITICAL DIMENSION OF SPACE-TIME IN DUAL MODELS. ''Phys. Lett.". 1973. 4SB. No.4, 333-336. Brink L.. Olive D.. Hebbi C.. Scherk J. THE MISSING GAUGE CONDITIONS FOR THE DUAL FERMION EMISSION VERTEX AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES. "Phy«.
Page 713 - Hori, K., Katz, S., Klemm, A., Pandharipande, R., Thomas, R., Vafa, C., Vakil, R., Zaslow, E.: Mirror symmetry. Clay Mathematics Monographs 1, American Mathematical Society, Providence, Clay Mathematics Institute, Cambridge, MA, (2003) HKS01.
Page 713 - Supergravity and the large N limit of theories with sixteen supercharges", Phys.
Page 705 - Cremmer, E., Julia, B. and Scherk, J. (1978), 'Supergravity theory in 11 dimensions', Phys. Lett. 76B, 409.
Page 6 - In conventional quantum field theory the elementary particles are mathematical points, whereas in perturbative string theory the fundamental objects are one-dimensional loops (of zero thickness). Strings have a characteristic length scale, which can be estimated by dimensional analysis. Since string theory is a relativistic quantum theory that includes gravity it must involve the fundamental constants c (the speed of light), h (Planck's constant divided by 2;r), and G (Newton's gravitational constant).

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Katrin Becker is a Professor of Physics at Texas A & M University. She has been awarded the Radcliffe Fellowship from Harvard University in 2006 and received the Alfred Sloan Fellowship in 2003.

Melanie Becker is a Professor of Physics at Texas A & M University. In 2006 she has been awarded an Edward, Frances and Shirley B. Daniels Fellowship from the Radcliffe Fellowship for Advanced studies at Harvard University. In 2001 she received the Alfred Sloan Fellowship.

John Schwarz is Harold Brown Professor of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology. He is a MacArthur Fellow and member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Bibliographic information