The Venture Caf?: Secrets, Strategies, and Stories from America's High-Tech Entrepreneurs (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Grand Central Publishing, Mar 14, 2002 - Business & Economics - 292 pages
2 Reviews
Written for anyone interested in cutting edge entrepreneuship, this work offers an inside account of what business and technology mavericks are really talking about.
  

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Review: The Venture Cafe : Secrets, Strategies, and Stories from America's High-Tech Entrepreneurs

User Review  - mel - Goodreads

about a friend of mine! Read full review

Review: The Venture Cafe : Secrets, Strategies, and Stories from America's High-Tech Entrepreneurs

User Review  - Brad - Goodreads

Great VC perspective. I don't know what the VC side is like, but I can't image this is too off. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
Chapter One
Throwing Teddy Out of the Pram
Far from the Maddening Crowd
Startups and Navel Piercings
Making Educated Guesses
Its Only Dangerous If You Dont Know What Youre Doing
Chapter Two
A Cohesive Multimedia Experience
Managing Growth
That Is the Question
Chapter Nine
New Management
A More Traditional Approach
Making a Video
The VCs View

Dont Jump Until Youre Ready
Dont Burn Your Bridges Before Youre Ready
The Importance of External Validation
Something to Think About
Who Will Drive You to the Mountain?
Entrepreneurship as a Family Affair
What Happens If Your Safety Net Cannot Support Your Weight?
Chapter Three
Cleanliness Is Next to Profitability
Can You Succeed on Your Own?
Describe Your Ideal Vacation
The Joys of Finding Your Own Office
Who Makes the Decisions?
Does Anyone Else Understand What Youre Doing?
Chapter Four
A Patent Is Only the Beginning
What Lawyers Can Do
It Pays to Be Picky
What a Patent Is Not
Paying Your Lawyer
Choose an Unpopular Research Area
Shout It from the Mountaintop
Chapter Five
Attitude Really Does Matter
Avoid the Bad Apples
Is the Candidate a Team Player?
Make Your Companys Presence Known
The Importance of Being Scientific
Nothing Succeeds Like Success
A Fun Place to Work
How Much Is a Stock Option Worth?
Control Freedom and Recognition
How to Close on an Employee
Burnout
The Importance of Taking a Break
Chapter Six
Its Hard for Them Too
Start with the Angel Investors
Our Money Is Better Than Theirs
What Investors Look For
How to Decide Which VC Firm to Approach
How to Approach a Venture Capitalist
The Office Meeting
The Formal Interview
A VCs Attitude Toward Confidentiality
The Site Visit
That Is the Question
Chapter Seven
They Have to Feel Like Theyre Getting a Bargain
Getting to the First Customer
Everybody Loves a Winner
Chapter Eight
Whats the Point of Sharing So Much Information?
A Higher Purpose
A Chance to Vent
Going Forward
Chapter Ten
A CEO Is Like a Lead Singer
Give Yourself a Big Break
Is Your Career Based on Family Rooms?
Abandoned at the Altar
Chapter Eleven
From Café to Garage
A Very Ambitious Task
It Cant Happen to Me
The Explanation
What Cotton and Orens Learned
The Importance of Vesting Schedules
How to Avoid Getting Taken
The Importance of Writing Things Down
Those Crazy VCs
Trouble in Paradise
Dealing with the Fallout
Getting Caught Up in the Details
A VCs View
Being Broke
Its Like Sales
Chapter Twelve
The Effect of Publicity on HighTech Startups
The Importance of Being Flashy
The Journalists Dilemma
Why Journalists Loved the Internet
But What About Everyone Else?
The Revenge of the Print Media
I Told You So I Told You So
Scandal Sells
The Season of Gloom and Doom
How to Manipulate the Media
Do Your Homework
DoItYourself Public Relations
Chapter Thirteen
How to Cash Out and Move On
Play Hard to Get
Big Success Means Big Responsibility
A Liquidity Event Changes the Way Employees Think About Their Jobs
The Process of Getting Serious
A Really Interesting Day
Is the World Any Different Because You Were Here?
Why Cant We All Get Along?
Chapter Fourteen
The Blackjack Ball
The Ideal Venue
Appendix A
Appendix B
Acknowledgments
Bibliography
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Esser is an active member of the MIT entrepreneurial community.

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