Benjamin Franklin

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Yale University Press, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 339 pages
23 Reviews
The greatest statesman of his age, Benjamin Franklin was also a pioneering scientist, a successful author, the first American postmaster general, a printer and a bon vivant. In addition, he was a man of vast contradictions. This biography offers a compact and provocative portrait of America's most extraordinary patriot.
  

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Review: Benjamin Franklin

User Review  - Leif Guiteau - Goodreads

Never knew what a polarizing figure this founding father was....well done by Morgan! Read full review

Review: Benjamin Franklin

User Review  - TH Waters - Goodreads

Wow. It's an understatement to say that Benjamin Franklin was a phenomenal human being, and for that reason alone I'm really glad I read Edmund S. Morgan's biography. Having said that, it's clear that ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

An Exciting World
1
A Dangerous Man
47
An Empire of Englishmen
71
Proprietary Pretensions
104
The Importance of Opinion
145
Endgame
189
Becoming American
220
Representing a Nation of States
242
A Difficult Peace
272
Going Home
298
Chronology
315
Some of the People in Franklins Life
317
Notes
323
Credits
333
Index
335
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Edmund Morgan spent most of his youth in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and was educated at the Belmont Hill School, Harvard, and the London School of Economics. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1942 and three years later began his teaching career at the University of Chicago.From there he moved first to Brown University and then to Yale, where he became Sterling Professor in 1965 and emeritus in 1986. Morgan's historical writings greatly enhance our understanding of such complex aspects of the American experience as Puritanism, the Revolution, and the relationship between slavery and racism. At the same time, they captivate readers in the classroom and beyond. His work is a felicitous blend of rigorous scholarship, imaginative analysis, and graceful presentation. Although sometimes characterized as the quintessential Whig historian, in reality Morgan transcends simplistic categorization and has done more, perhaps, than any other historian to open new and creative paths of inquiry into the meaning of the early American experience.

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