Travels and Adventures in Canada and the Indian Territories, Between the Years 1760 and 1776: In Two Parts (Google eBook)

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I. Riley, 1809 - Canada - 330 pages
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Page 81 - ... a view of the area of the fort, I beheld, in shapes the foulest and most terrible, the ferocious triumphs of barbarian conquerors. The dead were scalped and mangled ; the dying were writhing and shrieking under the unsatiated knife and tomahawk; and from the bodies of some, ripped open, their butchers were drinking the blood, scooped up in the hollow of joined hands, and quaffed amid shouts of rage and victory.
Page 80 - Langlade, my next neighbor, there was only a low fence, over which I easily climbed. At my entrance I found the whole family at the windows, gazing at the scene of blood before them. I addressed myself immediately to M. Langlade, begging that he would put me into some place of safety, until the heat of the affair should be over ; an act of charity by which he might perhaps preserve me from the general massacre ; but while I uttered my petition, M. Langlade, who. had looked for a moment at me, turned...
Page 101 - Menehwehna, who had the command in this enterprise, gave me your promise that you would protect my friend, delivering him from all danger, and giving him safely to me. "The performance of this promise I now claim. I come not with empty hands to ask it. You...
Page 44 - ... friend, among the white men, than the king of France ; but, for you, we have taken into consideration that you have ventured your life among us in the expectation that we should not molest you. You do not come armed, with an intention to make war; you come in peace, to trade with us, and supply us with necessaries, of which we are much in want.
Page 90 - I turned toward the spot where I knew the Indians to be encamped. This, however, did not suit the purpose of my enemy, who seized me by the arm, and drew me violently in the opposite direction, to the distance of fifty yards above the fort. Here, finding that I was approaching the bushes and...
Page 79 - Between the yard-door of my own house, and that of M. Langlade, my next neighbour, there was only a low fence, over which I easily climbed, At my entrance, I found the whole family at the windows, gazing at the scene of blood before them.
Page 111 - ... was ; but, when daylight visited my chamber, I discovered, with some feelings of horror, that I was lying on nothing less than a heap of human bones and skulls, which covered all the floor ! The day passed without the return of Wawatam, and without food.
Page 95 - ... for the Isles du Castor, which lie in the mouth of Lake Michigan; and we should have crossed the lake but that a thick fog came on, on account of which the Indians deemed it safer to keep the shore close under their lee. We therefore approached the lands of the...
Page 39 - Fort Michilimackinac was built by order of the governor-general of Canada, and garrisoned with a small number of militia, who, having families, soon became less soldiers than settlers. Most of those whom I found in the fort had originally served in the French army. The fort stands on the south side of the strait which is between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan.
Page 166 - Nations, who have all made peace with the English. He advises you to seize this opportunity of doing the same, as you cannot otherwise fail of being destroyed ; for the English are on their march with a great army, which will be joined by different nations of Indians. In a word, before the fall of the leaf they will be at Michilimackinac, and the Six Nations with them.

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